Chesapeake Bay Activities

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The Chesapeake Bay is our Nation’s largest estuary and provides over $100 billion in annual economic value. The USGS works with Federal, State, local, and academic partners to provide research and monitoring and to communicate results to inform management for the Chesapeake and other important landscapes across the Nation. See our Science page to learn about our themes and topics being addressed.

Chesapeake Bay Highlights for 2019

Chesapeake Bay Highlights for 2019

The USGS works with Federal, State, and academic science partners to conduct monitoring and research in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, the Nation’s largest estuary, and other critical ecosystems across the country.

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USGS updates trends for nutrients and sediment in the Watershed

USGS updates trends for nutrients and sediment in the Watershed

The Chesapeake Bay Program nontidal network consists of more than 100 stations throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Monitoring of nutrients, sediment, and flow is conducted to provide estimates of loads and trends in the watershed.

Learn more here

Quick Links

Learn more about USGS science activities in the Bay from our Science Strategy. Additional summaries of the USGS Chesapeake Bay Activities are available in the science topics section.

Science Features, Summaries, and Videos

USGS Chesapeake Bay Science Fact Sheet

Science activities

Chesapeake Bay Activities Bibliography

Freshwater Flow into Chesapeake Bay

Poster map of the Chesapeake Watershed

News

Date published: March 25, 2020

This year’s Bay Barometer sets a different type of foundation for Bay restoration

Chesapeake Bay Program — by Rachel Felver — March 25, 2020

Date published: January 29, 2020

Smallmouth woes range from contaminants to more stress at spawning sites

Bay Journal — by Ad Crable — January 29, 2020

Date published: January 23, 2020

Keeping microplastics out of the Bay

Chesapeake Bay Program — by Morgan Corey — January 23, 2020

Publications

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Year Published: 2020

Sediment and chemical contaminant loads in tributaries to the Anacostia River, Washington, District of Columbia, 2016–17

A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Washington, D.C., Department of Energy & Environment to estimate the loads of suspended-sediment-bound chemical compounds in five gaged tributaries and four ungaged tributaries of the Anacostia River (known locally as “Lower Anacostia River”) in Washington, D.C...

Wilson, Timothy P.
Wilson, T.P., 2019, Sediment and chemical contaminant loads in tributaries to the Anacostia River, Washington, District of Columbia, 2016–17: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5092, 146 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195092.

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Year Published: 2020

Patterns of denitrification potential in tidal freshwater forested wetlands

Limited evidence for spatial patterns of denitrification in tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFWs), seemingly due to high spatial variability in the process, is surprising considering the various spatial gradients of its biogeochemical and hydrogeomorphic controls in these ecosystems. Because certain physical environmental gradients may be...

Korol, Alicia R.; Noe, Gregory B.

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Year Published: 2019

Spatially referenced models of streamflow and nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment loads in streams of the northeastern United States

SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were developed to quantify and improve the understanding of the sources, fate, and transport of nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended sediment in the northeastern United States. Excessive nutrients and suspended sediment from upland watersheds and tributary streams have...

Ator, Scott W.
Ator, S.W., 2019, Spatially referenced models of streamflow and nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment loads in streams of the Northeastern United States: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5118, 57 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195118.