Chesapeake Bay Activities

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The Chesapeake Bay is our Nation’s largest estuary and provides over $100 billion in annual economic value. The USGS works with Federal, State, local, and academic partners to provide research and monitoring and to communicate results to inform management for the Chesapeake and other important landscapes across the Nation. See our Science page to learn about our themes and topics being addressed.

USGS develops tool to further examine nutrient and sediment trends

USGS develops tool to further examine nutrient and sediment trends

USGS has developed the nontidal network mapper to share the short-term (2009-2018) water-year nutrient and suspended-sediment load and trend results for the Chesapeake Bay Program’s non-tidal network.

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July Newsletter

July Newsletter

The USGS provides research and monitoring to better understand and restore the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. Here are some recent highlights.

July issue

Quick Links

Learn more about USGS science activities in the Bay from our Science Strategy. Additional summaries of the USGS Chesapeake Bay Activities are available in the science topics section.

Science Summaries, Features, and Videos

USGS Chesapeake Bay Science Fact Sheet

Science activities

Chesapeake Bay Activities Bibliography

Freshwater Flow into Chesapeake Bay

USGS updates for nutrient and sediment trends

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News

Date published: August 5, 2020

PCB cleanup makes uneven progress

Bay Journal — By Timothy Wheeler — August 5, 2020

August 3, 2020

Chesapeake Bay Activities Newsletter July 2020

The USGS provides research and monitoring to better understand and restore the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. Our technical reports and journal articles, which we translate into science summaries, provide the findings used by federal, state, and local decisionmakers to inform restoration and conservation decisions. Here are some recent highlights.

Learn more about USGS Chesapeake Bay activities

Publications

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Year Published: 2020

Estimating streamflow and base flow within the nontidal Chesapeake Bay riverine system

Daily mean streamflow was estimated for all the nontidal parts of the Chesapeake Bay riverine system with the Unit Flows in Networks of Channels computer application using measured streamflow at the most downstream gage of selected rivers. The streamflows estimated by the Unit Flows in Networks of Channels computer application were aggregated at...

Buffington, Patrick C.; Capel, Paul D.
Buffington, P.C., and Capel, P.D., 2020, Estimating streamflow and base flow within the nontidal Chesapeake Bay riverine system: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5055, 26 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205055.

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Year Published: 2020

Aquatic invasive species in the Chesapeake Bay drainage—Research-based needs and priorities of U.S. Geological Survey partners and collaborators

Executive SummaryThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is revising the Chesapeake Bay-based science plan to align it with recent U.S. Department of Interior and USGS science priorities that include, as stated in the plan, providing “an integrated understanding of the factors affecting fish habitat, fish health, and landscape conditions” in Chesapeake...

Densmore, Christine L.
Densmore, C.L., 2020, Aquatic invasive species in the Chesapeake Bay drainage—Research-based needs and priorities of U.S. Geological Survey partners and collaborators: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1057, 23 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201057.

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Year Published: 2020

Sediment dynamics and implications for management: State of the science from long‐term research in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, USA

This review aims to synthesize the current knowledge of sediment dynamics using insights from long‐term research conducted in the watershed draining to the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the U.S., to inform management actions to restore the estuary and its watershed. The sediment dynamics of the Chesapeake are typical of many impaired...

Noe, Gregory B.; Cashman, Matthew J.; Skalak, Katherine; Gellis, Allen; Hopkins, Kristina G.; Moyer, Douglas; Webber, James; Benthem, Adam; Maloney, Kelly O.; Brakebill, John; Sekellick, Andrew; Langland, Michael J.; Zhang, Qian; Shenk, Gary Wynee; Keisman, Jennifer L.D.; Hupp, Cliff R.