Fort Collins Science Center

Economics and Ecosystem Services

Federal policymakers and land managers are accountable to the public for how they invest public funds and for the outcomes of the policy and management decisions they make. Through a variety of economic analyses and custom modeling, SEA economists evaluate how investments and management decisions affect individuals, local communities, and society as a whole. Specifically, SEA economists (1) conduct economic effects analyses to quantify how spending cycles through local economies, generating business sales and supporting jobs and income; (2) conduct research to assess nonmarket values associated with public policy and land management practices; and (3) assess the economic values associated with ecosystem services, defined as socially valued goods and services resulting from ecosystem structures and functions, and other natural resource management issues.

Filter Total Items: 15
Date published: October 25, 2019
Status: Active

Economics and Ecosystem Services

Federal policymakers and land managers are accountable to the public for how they use public resources and for the outcomes of policy and management decisions. Through a variety of economic analyses and custom modeling, SEA economists evaluate how investments and management decisions affect individuals, local communities, and society as a whole.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Tools for Public Land Managers

Fort Collins Science Center Economists support numerous web applications that convey information and data to specific audiences. An important aspect of many of these tools is to connect practitioners and other stakeholders to resources.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Jobs and Business Activity

Department of the Interior programs and activities generate and support jobs and business activity in local economies.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Wildlife Economics

From the benefits of tourism and hunting, to the protection of rare and endangered species, economics can play an important role in understanding humans’ relationship with wildlife.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Value of Science

The science conducted across the USGS affects the well-being of hundreds of millions of Americans. However, it is challenging to quantify the value of this science, and better understanding and communication of this value is often needed.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Economics of Invasive Species

In managing invasive species, land managers and policy makers need information to help allocate scarce resources as efficiently and effectively as possible.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Economics of Ecological Restoration

Beyond the impacts to jobs and business activities, economics can play an important role in understanding the return on project investments by studying the benefits of project outcomes to society.

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Economics of Outdoor Recreation

Planning and managing recreation areas is a series of choices, and not a day goes by that that manager doesn’t face a question, which at its roots, is often economic.

Date published: June 21, 2018
Status: Active

Economics of Wildland Fire

In recent decades, wildfires have increased in size and intensity, and the fire season has lengthened. This and other factors have increased wildfire suppression costs and risks to human health and safety. SEA economists investigate numerous aspects of wildland fire, its impacts, and how to mitigate the risk wildfire poses to people, resources, and property.

Date published: June 21, 2018
Status: Active

Water Economics

Water is associated with numerous ecosystem services, including clean water for drinking, support for outdoor recreation, provision for other ecosystem processes, and direct cultural values. 

Date published: May 29, 2018
Status: Active

The Wildfire Research (WiRē) Team

Wildfires cost billions of dollars to suppress annually, yet they still devastate lives, communities, and ecosystems. While wildfire is a natural phenomenon, learning to live with wildfire is a social issue – so we need a social solution.

Date published: December 7, 2016
Status: Active

Uncovering the Ecosystem Service Value of Carbon Sequestration in National Parks

The National Park Service (NPS) preserves and protects more than 84 million acres of important historic, cultural, and natural resources across 401 sites for the enjoyment of present and future generations. Protected resources and landscapes managed by the National Park Service contribute to the societal welfare of the American public, reflected by ecosystem service values derived from their...