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Wildland Fire Science

USGS Fire Science is fundamental to understanding the causes, consequences, and benefits of wildfire and helps prevent and manage larger, catastrophic events. USGS scientists possess diverse technical capabilities that are used to address a variety of problems posed by wildland fires. Outcomes of USGS science can be used by fire and land managers to respond to fire-related issues when they arise.

News

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San Carlos Apache Tribe Hosts BIA’s Innovation Landscape Network Research Project

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Comunicado de prensa: Plan estratégico científico del USGS para incendios forestales, 2021–26

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LANDFIRE Updates Valuable Firefighting Data

Publications

Future direction of fuels management in sagebrush rangelands

Sagebrush ecosystems in the United States have been declining since EuroAmerican settlement, largely due to agricultural and urban development, invasive species, and altered fire regimes, resulting in loss of biodiversity and wildlife habitat. To combat continued conversion to undesirable ecological states and loss of habitat to invasive species fueled by frequent fire, a variety of fuel treatment

Plant community trajectories following livestock exclusion for conservation vary and hinge on initial invasion and soil-biocrust conditions in shrub steppe

Adjustments or complete withdrawal of livestock grazing are among the most common conservation actions in semiarid uplands, but outcomes can vary considerably with ecological context. Invasion by exotic annual grasses and the excessive wildfire they promote are increasing threats to semiarid shrub-steppe, and plant-community response to livestock exclusion in these areas may be complicated by the

Post-fire seed dispersal of a wind-dispersed shrub declined with distance to seed source, yet had high levels of unexplained variation

Plant-population recovery across large disturbance areas is often seed-limited. An understanding of seed dispersal patterns is fundamental for determining natural-regeneration potential. However, forecasting seed dispersal rates across heterogeneous landscapes remains a challenge. Our objectives were to determine (i) the landscape patterning of post-disturbance seed dispersal, and underlying sourc

Science

Forest Ecology

In various universities, many of our Units are situated in schools, divisions, or colleges of forestry, ecology, natural resources, and life sciences. Forest ecology is the study of plants, animals, and ecosystems, and the interconnected processes in forests. Our forest ecologists lead research and teach courses on prescribed fire, chronic wasting disease in deer, white-nose syndrome in bats...
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Forest Ecology

In various universities, many of our Units are situated in schools, divisions, or colleges of forestry, ecology, natural resources, and life sciences. Forest ecology is the study of plants, animals, and ecosystems, and the interconnected processes in forests. Our forest ecologists lead research and teach courses on prescribed fire, chronic wasting disease in deer, white-nose syndrome in bats...
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Wildland Fire Trends Tool

The Wildland Fire Trends Tool (WFTT) is a data visualization and analysis tool that calculates and displays wildfire trends and patterns for the western U.S. based on user-defined regions of interest, time periods, and ecosystem types. Users can use the tool to easily generate a variety of maps, graphs, and tabular data products that are informative for all levels of expertise. The WFTT provides...
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Wildland Fire Trends Tool

The Wildland Fire Trends Tool (WFTT) is a data visualization and analysis tool that calculates and displays wildfire trends and patterns for the western U.S. based on user-defined regions of interest, time periods, and ecosystem types. Users can use the tool to easily generate a variety of maps, graphs, and tabular data products that are informative for all levels of expertise. The WFTT provides...
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The Innovation Landscape Network

As public lands continue to experience rapid change brought on by fire, invasive species, and climate change, there is a growing need for science-management partnerships to apply innovative research, technology and adaptation strategies at an accelerated pace.
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The Innovation Landscape Network

As public lands continue to experience rapid change brought on by fire, invasive species, and climate change, there is a growing need for science-management partnerships to apply innovative research, technology and adaptation strategies at an accelerated pace.
Learn More