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Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center

Welcome to the USGS website that provides access to water resources information for the USGS Lower Mississippi-Gulf 5 State Water Science Center. Our center encompasses Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee including all of the unique water resources contained within! If you are seeking Real-Time Water Data for the states we serve please click the button below. 

News

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Southeast Region (SER) Science Workshop: Identifying Science to Meet Administration Priorities and the Needs of Our Stakeholders

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USGS Deploying Storm-tide Sensors in Louisiana, Mississippi in Advance of Hurricane Ida

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Media Alert: Flights Above the Mississippi Alluvial Plain and Adjacent Areas to Continue Aquifer Mapping

Publications

Aquatic-life criteria compared to concentrations of cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in streams near Fort Polk Military Reservation, Louisiana, December 2015–August 2016

The primary focus of this study was to document cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in selected streams near the U.S. Army Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and Fort Polk Military Reservation and to compare those values to Federal and State aquatic-life criteria guidelines. The acute aquatic-life criteria used for this study are as follows: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Hydrologic modification and channel evolution degrades connectivity on the Atchafalaya River floodplain

The Atchafalaya River Basin is the largest remaining forested wetland in the contiguous United States. Since 1960, dredging and channel erosion in the Basin have resulted in changes to the hydrologic connectivity that have not been quantified. Analyses were conducted to determine the hydraulic and geomorphic factors that have changed since discharge became controlled that may have decreased river/

Groundwater hydrology in the area of Savannah and Gunstocker Creeks in northeastern Hamilton, southern Meigs, and northwestern Bradley Counties, Tennessee, 2007–09

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Savannah Valley Utility District, evaluated the groundwater hydrology of the Valley and Ridge carbonate rock aquifer in northeastern Hamilton, southern Meigs, and northwestern Bradley Counties, Tennessee, from 2007 through 2009. The evaluation included, and built on, the results of test drilling conducted in the area in 1974 to determine the pote

Science

Detecting Sublethal Effects of Harmful Algal Blooms in Mammalian and Avian Cells

USGS Researchers are collaborating to study avian and mammalian cells to detect sublethal toxin effects following exposure to harmful algal blooms.
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Detecting Sublethal Effects of Harmful Algal Blooms in Mammalian and Avian Cells

USGS Researchers are collaborating to study avian and mammalian cells to detect sublethal toxin effects following exposure to harmful algal blooms.
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Vernal Pool Inundation Models

This website provides an application for exploring modeling results from a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project titled Mapping Climate Change Resistant Vernal Pools in the Northeastern U.S. The purpose of this project was to improve understanding of the factors that control inundation patterns in vernal pools of the northeastern United States, so as to identify pools that might function as...
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Vernal Pool Inundation Models

This website provides an application for exploring modeling results from a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project titled Mapping Climate Change Resistant Vernal Pools in the Northeastern U.S. The purpose of this project was to improve understanding of the factors that control inundation patterns in vernal pools of the northeastern United States, so as to identify pools that might function as...
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New dataset available on stream and floodplain geometry to inform restoration decisions

Issue: The need for stream mappingThe physical shape of streams and floodplains can provide information about how water, sediment, and other matter moves through the landscape. Streams can have deep channels (tall streambanks) disconnected from the floodplain or wide shallow channels that easily spill over the banks into the floodplain during high flows. Mapping where streams fall along this...
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New dataset available on stream and floodplain geometry to inform restoration decisions

Issue: The need for stream mappingThe physical shape of streams and floodplains can provide information about how water, sediment, and other matter moves through the landscape. Streams can have deep channels (tall streambanks) disconnected from the floodplain or wide shallow channels that easily spill over the banks into the floodplain during high flows. Mapping where streams fall along this...
Learn More