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Trace Elements

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Arsenic in the Wallkill River Basin

Concentrations of arsenic in four segments (reaches) of the Wallkill River and one segment of the Papakating Creek (a major tributary to the Wallkill River) have been found to exceed the New Jersey surface-water-quality standard of 0.0170 micrograms per liter. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New Jersey Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of...
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Arsenic in the Wallkill River Basin

Concentrations of arsenic in four segments (reaches) of the Wallkill River and one segment of the Papakating Creek (a major tributary to the Wallkill River) have been found to exceed the New Jersey surface-water-quality standard of 0.0170 micrograms per liter. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New Jersey Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of...
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New Jersey Ambient Surface-Water-Quality Monitoring Network

The USGS New Jersey Water Science Center, in cooperation with the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), New Jersey Water Supply Authority, and the Delaware River Basin Commission, maintain the New Jersey Ambient Surface-Water-Quality Monitoring Network (ASWQMN) — a collection of monitoring stations on streams throughout New Jersey. Constituent concentration data from the ASWQMN are...
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New Jersey Ambient Surface-Water-Quality Monitoring Network

The USGS New Jersey Water Science Center, in cooperation with the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), New Jersey Water Supply Authority, and the Delaware River Basin Commission, maintain the New Jersey Ambient Surface-Water-Quality Monitoring Network (ASWQMN) — a collection of monitoring stations on streams throughout New Jersey. Constituent concentration data from the ASWQMN are...
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Emerging Contaminants and their Effects on Fish and Frogs

The endocrine system in animals produce hormones to regulate essential life processes, such as metabolism, tissue function, reproduction, and development. A large group of natural and synthetic chemicals are known to disrupt endocrine function. Examples include plant hormones, plastic components, flame retardants, surfactants, fragrances, pesticides, etc. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs...
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Emerging Contaminants and their Effects on Fish and Frogs

The endocrine system in animals produce hormones to regulate essential life processes, such as metabolism, tissue function, reproduction, and development. A large group of natural and synthetic chemicals are known to disrupt endocrine function. Examples include plant hormones, plastic components, flame retardants, surfactants, fragrances, pesticides, etc. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs...
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Point and Nonpoint Sources of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds and the Potential effects on Fish and Frogs in the New Jersey Pinelands

Scientists from the NJ WSC, Leetown Science Center and New Jersey Pinelands Commission recently initiated a 4 year study designed to characterize the point and non-point sources of endocrine disrupting compound (EDCs) and their potential effects on fish and frogs in the NJ Pinelands.
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Point and Nonpoint Sources of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds and the Potential effects on Fish and Frogs in the New Jersey Pinelands

Scientists from the NJ WSC, Leetown Science Center and New Jersey Pinelands Commission recently initiated a 4 year study designed to characterize the point and non-point sources of endocrine disrupting compound (EDCs) and their potential effects on fish and frogs in the NJ Pinelands.
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Evaluation of OWCs in Ground Water Near Septic Systems in NJ

Demands on ground water resources in New Jersey require the availability of high quality water for multiple uses. Water resources planning must address these and other needs to insure a water supply of sufficient quality capable of meeting present and future needs throughout the State. The development and implementation of a study on PPCPs and OWCs released to shallow ground water from large scale...
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Evaluation of OWCs in Ground Water Near Septic Systems in NJ

Demands on ground water resources in New Jersey require the availability of high quality water for multiple uses. Water resources planning must address these and other needs to insure a water supply of sufficient quality capable of meeting present and future needs throughout the State. The development and implementation of a study on PPCPs and OWCs released to shallow ground water from large scale...
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Northern New Jersey Radionuclides

Elevated gross alpha-particle activity in groundwater has recently been documented from scattered areas in northern New Jersey. Initial data compilations indicate most of this alpha-particle activity is attributable to long-lived isotopes of U, and to a lesser extent, the long-lived progeny, Ra-226. The project will consist of three phases to be completed cooperatively between the USGS and NJDEP...
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Northern New Jersey Radionuclides

Elevated gross alpha-particle activity in groundwater has recently been documented from scattered areas in northern New Jersey. Initial data compilations indicate most of this alpha-particle activity is attributable to long-lived isotopes of U, and to a lesser extent, the long-lived progeny, Ra-226. The project will consist of three phases to be completed cooperatively between the USGS and NJDEP...
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Background Metals in Surface Water

Results of water-quality sampling in tributaries and major rivers of New Jersey have revealed that arsenic levels that exceed the human-health-based Surface Water Quality Standard (SWQS) are widespread. Exceedances of the mercury SWQS are prevalent, although less widespread than arsenic exceedances.
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Background Metals in Surface Water

Results of water-quality sampling in tributaries and major rivers of New Jersey have revealed that arsenic levels that exceed the human-health-based Surface Water Quality Standard (SWQS) are widespread. Exceedances of the mercury SWQS are prevalent, although less widespread than arsenic exceedances.
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Phase II Trackdown of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in the Elizabeth River, New Jersey

Data collected during Phase I of the NJ Toxics Reduction Workplan for NY-NJ Harbor (NJTRWP) at the Elizabeth River head-of-tide sampling site (and in the downstream tidal Elizabeth River) show elevated levels for contaminants compared to other locations in the harbor. An additional NJTRWP Phase II study was conducted in July/August 2003 in an effort to determine if either of the two minor...
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Phase II Trackdown of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in the Elizabeth River, New Jersey

Data collected during Phase I of the NJ Toxics Reduction Workplan for NY-NJ Harbor (NJTRWP) at the Elizabeth River head-of-tide sampling site (and in the downstream tidal Elizabeth River) show elevated levels for contaminants compared to other locations in the harbor. An additional NJTRWP Phase II study was conducted in July/August 2003 in an effort to determine if either of the two minor...
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Mercury Variability in domestic wells

Since 1982, mercury (Hg) concentrations that exceed the State and USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 g/L have been reported for water withdrawn from more than 600 domestic wells finished in the unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system in southern New Jersey. Actions have been taken to protect well owners from further exposure by providing treatment systems or hookups to public-water...
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Mercury Variability in domestic wells

Since 1982, mercury (Hg) concentrations that exceed the State and USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 g/L have been reported for water withdrawn from more than 600 domestic wells finished in the unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system in southern New Jersey. Actions have been taken to protect well owners from further exposure by providing treatment systems or hookups to public-water...
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Monitoring Mercury in Wet Deposition

Mercury accumulates in biological tissue through complex reactions (bioaccumulation). Bacteria convert environmental inorganic mercury into methyl mercury (Me-Hg). This Me-Hg form is more toxic and more difficult to remove from bacterial systems than inorganic mercury. As humans consume fish, the Me-Hg in the fish is also consumed. Neurotoxicity is the most important health concern with mercury...
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Monitoring Mercury in Wet Deposition

Mercury accumulates in biological tissue through complex reactions (bioaccumulation). Bacteria convert environmental inorganic mercury into methyl mercury (Me-Hg). This Me-Hg form is more toxic and more difficult to remove from bacterial systems than inorganic mercury. As humans consume fish, the Me-Hg in the fish is also consumed. Neurotoxicity is the most important health concern with mercury...
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Removal of Unregulated Organic Chemicals (UOC's) in Water Treatment Processes

Numerous organic chemicals are used every day for industrial, commercial and household purposes. Recent investigations have indicated that a number of these chemicals have found their way into many of the nation’s wastewater treatment facilities, receiving waters, aquifers and drinking water treatment facilities. This project will evaluate a variety of treatment processes (different design and...
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Removal of Unregulated Organic Chemicals (UOC's) in Water Treatment Processes

Numerous organic chemicals are used every day for industrial, commercial and household purposes. Recent investigations have indicated that a number of these chemicals have found their way into many of the nation’s wastewater treatment facilities, receiving waters, aquifers and drinking water treatment facilities. This project will evaluate a variety of treatment processes (different design and...
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Raccoon Creek Arsenic

Arsenic concentrations in the waters of Raccoon Creek commonly exceed the New Jersey Surface Water Quality Standard (SWQS) of 0.017. It is currently not known how much of the arsenic measured in streamwater and in bed sediments is contributed by stormwater runoff. Runoff also can contribute trace metals such as cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, and nutrients to streams; these contaminants typically...
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Raccoon Creek Arsenic

Arsenic concentrations in the waters of Raccoon Creek commonly exceed the New Jersey Surface Water Quality Standard (SWQS) of 0.017. It is currently not known how much of the arsenic measured in streamwater and in bed sediments is contributed by stormwater runoff. Runoff also can contribute trace metals such as cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, and nutrients to streams; these contaminants typically...
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