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Science

The New Jersey Water Science Center's mission is to collect, and disseminate reliable scientific information on issues affecting rivers, lakes, estuaries, groundwater, and water resources across the state of New Jersey and its neighbors. These data provide the scientific knowledge that engineers, planners, and managers can use to make informed water-resources decisions. 

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Surface Water and Groundwater Monitoring

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Water Quality

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Advanced Capabilities and Modeling

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Hazards

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Coastal Science

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Water Availability and Use

FAQs

Can you predict earthquakes?

No. Neither the USGS nor any other scientists have ever predicted a major earthquake. We do not know how, and we do not expect to know how any time in the foreseeable future. USGS scientists can only calculate the probability that a significant earthquake will occur (shown on our hazard mapping) in a specific area within a certain number of years. An earthquake prediction must define 3 elements: 1...

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Can you predict earthquakes?

No. Neither the USGS nor any other scientists have ever predicted a major earthquake. We do not know how, and we do not expect to know how any time in the foreseeable future. USGS scientists can only calculate the probability that a significant earthquake will occur (shown on our hazard mapping) in a specific area within a certain number of years. An earthquake prediction must define 3 elements: 1...

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Can animals predict earthquakes?

The earliest reference we have to unusual animal behavior prior to a significant earthquake is from Greece in 373 BC. Rats, weasels, snakes, and centipedes reportedly left their homes and headed for safety several days before a destructive earthquake. Anecdotal evidence abounds of animals, fish, birds, reptiles, and insects exhibiting strange behavior anywhere from weeks to seconds before an...

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Can animals predict earthquakes?

The earliest reference we have to unusual animal behavior prior to a significant earthquake is from Greece in 373 BC. Rats, weasels, snakes, and centipedes reportedly left their homes and headed for safety several days before a destructive earthquake. Anecdotal evidence abounds of animals, fish, birds, reptiles, and insects exhibiting strange behavior anywhere from weeks to seconds before an...

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Why are we having so many earthquakes? Has naturally occurring earthquake activity been increasing? Does this mean a big one is going to hit? OR We haven't had any earthquakes in a long time; does this mean that the pressure is building up for a big one?

A temporary increase or decrease in seismicity is part of the normal fluctuation of earthquake rates. Neither an increase nor decrease worldwide is a positive indication that a large earthquake is imminent. The ComCat earthquake catalog contains an increasing number of earthquakes in recent years--not because there are more earthquakes, but because there are more seismic instruments and they are...

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Why are we having so many earthquakes? Has naturally occurring earthquake activity been increasing? Does this mean a big one is going to hit? OR We haven't had any earthquakes in a long time; does this mean that the pressure is building up for a big one?

A temporary increase or decrease in seismicity is part of the normal fluctuation of earthquake rates. Neither an increase nor decrease worldwide is a positive indication that a large earthquake is imminent. The ComCat earthquake catalog contains an increasing number of earthquakes in recent years--not because there are more earthquakes, but because there are more seismic instruments and they are...

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Education

Major aquifers in New Jersey

Major aquifers in New Jersey consist of regionally extensive areas where the geologic formation or group of formations provide sufficient quantity of groundwater to wells for potable water supply.

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Major aquifers in New Jersey

Major aquifers in New Jersey consist of regionally extensive areas where the geologic formation or group of formations provide sufficient quantity of groundwater to wells for potable water supply.

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Groundwater Response to Earthquakes

Did you know? Earthquakes can affect groundwater levels?

 

We often see a response to large (and sometimes not so large) earthquakes in groundwater levels in wells. The USGS maintains a network of wells for monitoring various things like natural variability in water levels and response to pumping and climate change across the U.S.

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Groundwater Response to Earthquakes

Did you know? Earthquakes can affect groundwater levels?

 

We often see a response to large (and sometimes not so large) earthquakes in groundwater levels in wells. The USGS maintains a network of wells for monitoring various things like natural variability in water levels and response to pumping and climate change across the U.S.

Learn More

USGS Data Delivery Tools

USGS WaterAlert allows users to set notification thresholds for any USGS real-time data collection station, including stream, tidal, and groundwater gages, water-quality, and weather stations and sends emails or text messages to subscribers whenever the threshold conditions are met, as often as every hour.

USGS WaterNow allows you to send a text message or email containing a USGS current-conditions

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USGS Data Delivery Tools

USGS WaterAlert allows users to set notification thresholds for any USGS real-time data collection station, including stream, tidal, and groundwater gages, water-quality, and weather stations and sends emails or text messages to subscribers whenever the threshold conditions are met, as often as every hour.

USGS WaterNow allows you to send a text message or email containing a USGS current-conditions

Learn More