National Minerals Information Center

Titanium Statistics and Information

Titanium occurs primarily in the minerals anatase, brookite, ilmenite, leucoxene, perovskite, rutile, and sphene.   Of these minerals, only ilmenite, leucoxene, and rutile have significant economic importance.  As a metal, titanium is well known for corrosion resistance and for its high strength-to-weight ratio.  Approximately 95% of titanium is consumed in the form of titanium dioxide (TiO2), a white pigment in paints, paper, and plastics.  TiO2 pigment is characterized by its purity, refractive index, particle size, and surface properties.  To develop optimum pigment properties, the particle size is controlled within the range of about 0.2 to 0.4 micrometer.  The superiority of TiO2 as a white pigment is due mainly to its high refractive index and resulting light-scattering ability, which impart excellent hiding power and brightness.

Subscribe to receive an email notification when a publication is added to this page.

Annual Publications

Mineral Commodity Summaries

Minerals Yearbook

Quarterly Publications

Mineral Industry Surveys

Special Publications

Links

Contacts

George Bedinger

USGS Mineral Commodity Specialist
Commodity Statistics and Information
Phone: 703-648-6183