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Aeroecology

Current research at the NOROCK explores the behavior and ecology of migratory birds, information vital to resource managers to help plan for ways to conserve these species into the future. Much of this research is conducted in the context of Aeroecology, an emerging discipline that relies on radar and other kinds of remote sensing technology to understand the behavior and ecology of flying animals.The work follows three broad themes: 1) Gather information to help direct conservation and management and determine how birds may be influenced by anthropogenic activity, especially in relation to alternative energy development; 2) Understand the behavior, ecology, and conservation of migrating birds; 3) Advance the remote sensing technologies biologists use to study birds and other wildlife.
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Energy development and the airspace

Today, the alternative energy and telecommunications industries are developing the airspace much the way metropolitan growth and mechanized agriculture develop the landscape. NOROCK scientists and partners are using both historical and traditional technologies in new and innovative ways to observe wildlife behaviors in response to these changing habitats.
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Energy development and the airspace

Today, the alternative energy and telecommunications industries are developing the airspace much the way metropolitan growth and mechanized agriculture develop the landscape. NOROCK scientists and partners are using both historical and traditional technologies in new and innovative ways to observe wildlife behaviors in response to these changing habitats.
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Realizing the biological potential of weather radar

The modern use of field deployed remote sensors generates large amounts of environmental data on natural systems, and this benefits natural sciences. Today’s automated sensors are fast, run nearly continuously, eliminate the need for “people power”, are cost effective to operate and maintain, and monitor the environment in ways humans cannot. The US network of more than 200 weather radars, the...
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Realizing the biological potential of weather radar

The modern use of field deployed remote sensors generates large amounts of environmental data on natural systems, and this benefits natural sciences. Today’s automated sensors are fast, run nearly continuously, eliminate the need for “people power”, are cost effective to operate and maintain, and monitor the environment in ways humans cannot. The US network of more than 200 weather radars, the...
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Remote sensing flying animals

NOROCK scientists and collaborators are working to advance their tools of the trade. Specifically, weather radars, portable radars, thermal imaging cameras, and automated radio tracking are capable mature technologies, able to detect the movement patterns and other behaviors of flying animals at night and at distances far beyond the limits of human vision.
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Remote sensing flying animals

NOROCK scientists and collaborators are working to advance their tools of the trade. Specifically, weather radars, portable radars, thermal imaging cameras, and automated radio tracking are capable mature technologies, able to detect the movement patterns and other behaviors of flying animals at night and at distances far beyond the limits of human vision.
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The ecology, behavior, and conservation of migratory birds

U.S. Geological Survey research contributes to conservation measures and improved management of migratory bird populations and their habitats across the United States. Migratory birds provide ecosystem benefits that include pest control, pollination of plants and serve as food sources for other wildlife. They are also a source of recreation for millions of bird watchers and enthusiasts who provide...
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The ecology, behavior, and conservation of migratory birds

U.S. Geological Survey research contributes to conservation measures and improved management of migratory bird populations and their habitats across the United States. Migratory birds provide ecosystem benefits that include pest control, pollination of plants and serve as food sources for other wildlife. They are also a source of recreation for millions of bird watchers and enthusiasts who provide...
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Radar Technology - A Tool for Understanding Migratory Aerofauna

Understanding the factors affecting migratory bird and bat populations during all three phases of their life cycle—breeding, non-breeding, and migration—is critical to species conservation planning. This includes the need for information about these species’ responses to natural challenges, as well as information about the impact of human activities that alter resources critical to migrants during...
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Radar Technology - A Tool for Understanding Migratory Aerofauna

Understanding the factors affecting migratory bird and bat populations during all three phases of their life cycle—breeding, non-breeding, and migration—is critical to species conservation planning. This includes the need for information about these species’ responses to natural challenges, as well as information about the impact of human activities that alter resources critical to migrants during...
Learn More