Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

News

Below are our most recent NOROCK and USGS News items. If you are with the media, please contact Acting PIO Sarah Beldin at sbeldin@usgs.gov with any media or outreach requests.

Filter Total Items: 68
Date published: October 1, 2019

Detecting Invasive and Rare Species with the National Streamflow Network

Two recently published papers suggest the integration of environmental DNA, or eDNA, sampling at select National Streamflow Network streamgages in the U.S. Northwest is feasible.

Date published: July 22, 2019

IGBST Public Notifications and Resources

As part of ongoing efforts required under the 2016 Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy to monitor the population of grizzly bears in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) captures and monitors grizzly bears for research and monitoring purposes. Here you will find capture notifications for the 2019 field season.

Date published: May 17, 2019

An Integrated Framework for Ecological Drought Across Riverscapes of North America

Climate change is increasing extreme droughts events, posing a threat to freshwater ecosystems, particularly with human demands for diminishing water supplies. 

Date published: March 20, 2019

USGS Grizzly Bear Biologist Receives Wyoming Outdoor Hall of Fame Honors

On March 22, USGS Supervisory Wildlife Biologist Mark Haroldson will be inducted into the Wyoming Outdoor Hall of Fame for his contributions to understanding grizzly bear biology, ecology, and...

Date published: October 26, 2018

A Unified Research Strategy for Disease Management

As wildlife diseases increase globally, an understanding of host-pathogen relationships can elucidate avenues for management and improve conservation efficacy. Amphibians are among the most threatened groups of wildlife, and disease is a major factor in global amphibian declines.

Date published: September 28, 2018

Large-scale Review of Amphibian Species and Community Response to Climate Change

Amphibian species and community richness has been declining in North America and climate change may play a role in these declines. Global climate change has led to a range shift of many wildlife species and thus understanding how these changes in species distribution can be used to predict amphibian community responses that may improve conservation efforts.

Date published: April 11, 2018

NOROCK Scientist Receives USGS Award for Lifetime Achievement in Science Communications

Research Ecologist Dan Fagre is the recipient of the 2017 Eugene M. Shoemaker Award for Lifetime Achievement in Communications

Date published: April 4, 2018

Long-term population dynamics and conservation risk of migratory bull trout in the upper Columbia River Basin

Conservation of migratory and sensitive fish like bull trout will require ecosystem level approaches that target stressors in headwater spawning and rearing habitats as well as critical habitats in rivers and lakes used during juvenile and adult life stages.

Date published: February 23, 2018

Annotated Bibliography: Research on Greater Sage-grouse since January 2015

The sheer number of scientific publications related to greater sage-grouse research can be a challenge for managers to navigate when updating plans for managing greater sage-grouse and sagebrush ecosystems. To assist in this process, the USGS reviewed and summarized scientific literature published since January 1, 2015.

Date published: December 12, 2017

Saving Salamanders: Vital to Ecosystem Health

Amphibians—the big-eyed, swimming-crawling-jumping-climbing group of water and land animals that includes frogs, toads, salamanders and worm-like caecilians—are the world’s most endangered vertebrates.