Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

News

Below are our most recent NOROCK and USGS News items. If you are with the media, please contact Todd Wojtowicz, communications biologist, at twojtowicz@usgs.gov with any media or outreach requests.

Filter Total Items: 74
Date published: June 17, 2021

Media Event: New Insight into Climate Change Impacts on Yellowstone

Federal and university partners invite members of the media to a virtual news conference next week about past and future effects of climate change on the iconic Greater Yellowstone Area.   

Date published: April 20, 2021

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center Engages the Bureau of Land Management on Science Co-Production

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) scientists met with three Montana Bureau of Land Management (BLM) District offices to link BLM science needs with USGS resources. NOROCK scientists introduced their research and capabilities, BLM specialists discussed knowledge gaps and science needs, and the two groups examined ways to collaborate. The meetings were held in spring 2021.

Date published: March 19, 2021

Friday's Findings - April 2 2021

Adaptive Monitoring in Action: Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Date: April 2, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: Kathi Irvine, Research Statistician, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

...

Date published: December 28, 2020

Chronic Wasting Disease: Can Science Save Our Dear Deer?

What’s in a name? Chronic wasting disease sounds ominous, too descriptive for comfort, almost impolite in its directness. It is, in fact, a truthful name for a disease and a real threat to North America’s cervids.

Date published: September 18, 2020

Use of Robotic DNA Samplers That Can Rapidly Detect Invasive Aquatic Species

USGS researchers and their collaborators demonstrated the efficacy of using robotic environmental DNA samplers for bio surveillance in freshwater systems, showing that samples collected, processed, and preserved by robotic sampler detect organism DNA in the environment at rates comparable to those collected traditionally by human technicians.

Date published: August 12, 2020

IGBST Public Notifications and Resources

As part of ongoing efforts required under the 2016 Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy to monitor the population of grizzly bears in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) captures and monitors grizzly bears for research and monitoring purposes. Here you will find capture notifications for the 2020 field season.

Date published: August 3, 2020

Friday's Findings - August 7 2020

Using Models and Web Applications for Chronic Wasting Disease Scenario Planning

Date: August 7, 2020 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: Paul Cross, Research Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

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Date published: July 16, 2020

USGS Scientists are Busy as a Bee

Many bumble bee species have declined in recent decades due to changes in habitat, climate, and pressures from pathogens, pesticides and introduced species. The western bumble bee, once common throughout western North America, is a species of concern and is being considered for listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Endangered Species Act.

Date published: October 1, 2019

Detecting Invasive and Rare Species with the National Streamflow Network

Two recently published papers suggest the integration of environmental DNA, or eDNA, sampling at select National Streamflow Network streamgages in the U.S. Northwest is feasible.

Date published: May 17, 2019

An Integrated Framework for Ecological Drought Across Riverscapes of North America

Climate change is increasing extreme droughts events, posing a threat to freshwater ecosystems, particularly with human demands for diminishing water supplies. 

Date published: March 20, 2019

USGS Grizzly Bear Biologist Receives Wyoming Outdoor Hall of Fame Honors

On March 22, USGS Supervisory Wildlife Biologist Mark Haroldson will be inducted into the Wyoming Outdoor Hall of Fame for his contributions to understanding grizzly bear biology, ecology, and...

Date published: October 26, 2018

A Unified Research Strategy for Disease Management

As wildlife diseases increase globally, an understanding of host-pathogen relationships can elucidate avenues for management and improve conservation efficacy. Amphibians are among the most threatened groups of wildlife, and disease is a major factor in global amphibian declines.