Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Home

We hope you will enjoy learning about the variety of ecosystems and species we are studying throughout the United States. We are part of the Northwest Region of the USGS and our scientists work on diverse issues such as climate change, endangered species, wildlife health, invasive species, and much more. Click on Science to begin exploring the places we go and the species and landscapes we study.

NOROCK EcoLunch Seminar!

NOROCK EcoLunch Seminar!

USGS Collaborator and Penn State graduate student Kezia Manlove talks pneumonia dynamics in bighorn sheep, the demographic effects and behavioral drivers.

NOROCK EcoLunch!

Colorado River Flows Reduced

Colorado River Flows Reduced

A recent study by researchers from the University of Arizona, University of Nevada, and USGS uncovered the lesser known role of spring and summer temperatures on streamflow in the upper Colorado River basin.

Read More

News

An American pika collects grass and flowers to stockpile its winter food supplies.
August 25, 2016

American pikas – small herbivores that typically live in rocky slopes, known as talus, across many mountain ranges in the American West – are disappearing from some locations across the West due to climate change, according to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey and some of its partners.

Image of Kezia Manlove
August 23, 2016

NOROCK EcoLunch is a forum for students, researchers, visiting scientists and collaborators in the environmental sciences to present their current and past work. Presentations will range from brown bag discussions of ongoing projects to more formal and polished seminar presentations. 

Bull trout in the Flathead River.
August 15, 2016

Bull trout populations are lower, more variable, and declining where stream habitat is limited, invasive species and land-use (i.e., roads) are prevalent, and stream temperatures are highest, according to a new study led by the USGS.

Publications

Effects of food limitation and emigration on self-thinning in experimental minnow cohorts
Year Published: 2016

Effects of food limitation and emigration on self-thinning in experimental minnow cohorts

1. The theory of food-regulated self-thinning (FST) for mobile animals predicts population density (N) to be an inverse function of mean body mass (W) scaled to an exponent (b), such that N = k W−b, where k is a constant. FST also predicts energy requirements (or energy flow) to remain constant over time (termed energetic equivalence) as losses to cohorts (e.g. emigration and mortality) are...Read More

A framework for assessing the feasibility of native fish conservation translocations: Applications to threatened bull trout
Year Published: 2016

A framework for assessing the feasibility of native fish conservation translocations: Applications to threatened bull trout

There is an urgent need to consider more aggressive and direct interventions for the conservation of freshwater fishes that are threatened by invasive species, habitat loss, and climate change. Conservation introduction (moving a species outside its indigenous range to other areas where conditions are predicted to be more suitable) is one type of translocation strategy that fisheries managers can...Read More

A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits
Year Published: 2016

A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits

Occupancy modeling is important for exploring species distribution patterns and for conservation monitoring. Within this framework, explicit attention is given to species detection probabilities estimated from replicate surveys to sample units. A central assumption is that replicate surveys are independent Bernoulli trials, but this assumption becomes untenable when ecologists serially deploy...Read More