Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

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We hope you will enjoy learning about the variety of ecosystems and species we are studying throughout the United States. We are part of the Northwest Region of the USGS and our scientists work on diverse issues such as climate change, endangered species, wildlife health, invasive species, and much more. Click on Science to begin exploring the places we go and the species and landscapes we study.

Large Carnivore Research Program

Large Carnivore Research Program

NOROCK has expanded its expertise in large carnivore research, primarily involving species listed as Threatened or Endangered. To better highlight this work, we have developed the Large Carnivore Research Program.

Large Carnivore Team

Colorado River Flows Reduced

Colorado River Flows Reduced

A recent study by researchers from the University of Arizona, University of Nevada, and USGS uncovered the lesser known role of spring and summer temperatures on streamflow in the upper Colorado River basin.

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News

An American bullfrog.
June 30, 2016

Bozeman - A new U.S. Geological Survey study illustrates the usefulness of genetic approaches to track invasive bullfrog introductions. Results will inform management actions for identifying and controlling importation and secondary spread of invasive bullfrogs in Montana.  

Ready to remove from the trap
June 28, 2016

As part of ongoing efforts required under the Endangered Species Act to monitor the population of grizzly bears in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) traps and monitors grizzly bears for research and monitoring purposes. Here you will find trapping notifications for the 2016 field season.

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.
June 24, 2016

MISSOULA – Gravel-bed river floodplains are some of the most ecologically important habitats in North America, according to a new study by scientists from the U.S. and Canada. Their research shows how broad valleys coming out of glaciated mountains provide highly productive and important habitat for a large diversity of aquatic, avian and terrestrial species.

Publications

Effects of food limitation and emigration on self-thinning in experimental minnow cohorts
Year Published: 2016

Effects of food limitation and emigration on self-thinning in experimental minnow cohorts

1. The theory of food-regulated self-thinning (FST) for mobile animals predicts population density (N) to be an inverse function of mean body mass (W) scaled to an exponent (b), such that N = k W−b, where k is a constant. FST also predicts energy requirements (or energy flow) to remain constant over time (termed energetic equivalence) as losses to cohorts (e.g. emigration and mortality) are...Read More

A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits
Year Published: 2016

A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits

Occupancy modeling is important for exploring species distribution patterns and for conservation monitoring. Within this framework, explicit attention is given to species detection probabilities estimated from replicate surveys to sample units. A central assumption is that replicate surveys are independent Bernoulli trials, but this assumption becomes untenable when ecologists serially deploy...Read More

Amphibian mortality events and ranavirus outbreaks in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Year Published: 2016

Amphibian mortality events and ranavirus outbreaks in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Mortality events in wild amphibians go largely undocumented, and where events are detected, the numbers of dead amphibians observed are probably a small fraction of actual mortality (Green and Sherman 2001; Skerratt et al. 2007). Incidental observations from field surveys can, despite limitations, provide valuable information on the presence, host species, and spatial distribution of diseases...Read More