New York Water Science Center

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Date published: August 23, 2019

Field Photo Friday Winner for August, 2019

Riley Behrens and Anthony Cacace are replacing an intake on Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) gage 01376520 Hudson River at Pier 26 at New York, NY. Photo by Natalie Cheung (Public domain)

Date published: May 15, 2019

USGS Kicks Off Innovative Project to Study Harmful Algal Blooms in New York

Monitoring Effort Supports State’s Initiative to Combat Potentially Toxic Blooms

Date published: May 6, 2019

Lake Ontario Elevation Gages

Extreme flooding on Lake Ontario can result in millions of dollars in damages to shoreline properties. Currently, USGS Lake Ontario gages report elevations around 247.8 ft above International Great Lakes Datum of 1985; a foot below record flood elevations observed in 2017. During 2017, wind-driven waves pounded the shoreline, causing widespread damage to infrastructure, homes, and businesses...

Date published: April 9, 2019

Drought Streamflow Probabilities in Northeast Region

Maximum likelihood logistic regression (MLLR) is used to estimate drought probabilities for selected Northeast rivers and streams. Winter streamflows are used to estimate the chance of hydrologic drought during summer months. This application allows the display and query of these drought streamflow probabilities for Northeastern streams.

Date published: February 23, 2019

New Wells in LI Sustainability Well Network

Drilling Updates

Date published: October 26, 2018

Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition on Tree Growth, Survival, and Carbon Sequestration Across the U.S.

There is scientific controversy about whether nitrogen deposition increases forest carbon sequestration. All tree species do not exhibit the same response to nitrogen and responses may be complicated by interactions with biotic and other abiotic factors such as sulfur deposition. 

Date published: March 7, 2018

USGS Flood Experts Respond to High Water in Central, Northeastern U.S.

Crews from the U.S. Geological Survey have been in the field for weeks measuring flooding in the Midwest and in the Mississippi River watershed, and more recently flooding and storm tides on the Northern Atlantic coast, as higher temperatures, heavy rain, snowmelt and nor’easters affected numerous states. 

Date published: March 1, 2018

USGS Deploys Storm-Tide Sensors in Advance of Nor’Easter

USGS field crews are deploying storm-tide and wave sensors today from Maine to Delaware to track and study a Nor’easter forecasted to begin tomorrow.