Long Island Surface-Water Network

Science Center Objects

U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Monitoring on Long Island, New York

Most streams and lakes on Long Island are hydraulically connected with the shallow groundwater system, and provide a window to the overall health of the underlying aquifer system. These water bodies are usually the first to show changes in the underlying aquifer, so there needs to be a consistent dataset of hydrologic data available for water managers and scientist to use to assess long- and short-term changes that may indicate potential environmental and wetlands health issues or underlying groundwater-resource concerns.

The USGS has operated a surface-water monitoring network on Long since the early 1930’s. This network of USGS stream and lake monitoring stations provides data to support hydrologic-related issues such as water-supply management, flood and drought monitoring, urban-development and resiliency planning, bridge, road, and culvert design, landuse and climate change studies, nutrient loading and habitat assessments, and recreation use.

The current USGS surface-water monitoring network encompasses data collection from approximately 55 streams and 2 lakes throughout Long Island (fig. 1). Data from this network are collected in varying frequencies to supply our cooperators, stakeholders, and the public with mission critical information on wetlands and aquifer health.

Map of northeast with multicolored dots

 Figure 1. Real-Time Streamflow Compared to Historical Streamflow for the Day: The map shown above is a July 2018 snapshot from the USGS WaterWatch interactive mapper that provides information on the current status of streamflow for New York. To access the interactive map click here. (Public domain.)

Project Data 

The USGS collects surface-water data needed by Federal, State, and local agencies for water-resource management, engineering projects, and regulatory programs throughout the region. All project data are served online through the USGS National Water Information System: Web Interface (NWISWeb) and other online systems, where data or hydrographs from monitoring stations can be displayed or downloaded as needed.

 

Surface-Water Data for Long Island

 

New York State, Regional, and National Surface-Water Data

 

Related Studies and Other Information

In addition to basic hydrologic-data collection, the USGS conducts hydrologic studies that address a wide variety of water-resources issues, including water supply, contamination, nutrient loading, effects of land use on water quality and quantity, and other basic hydrologic research. A list of some related USGS studies and other useful information can be found below.

 

Local and Regional Studies

 

Educational and General Information

 

Publications

The USGS publishes water-information reports on many topics and in many formats such as scientific and technical articles and reports, fact sheets, pamphlets, and posters resulting from the research performed by our scientists and partners. A list of selected publications related to the USGS Long Island surface-water monitoring program can be found below.

 

Surface-Water Related Publications and Studies

Aronson, D.A., 1978, Determination of runoff coefficients of storm-water-basin drainage areas on Long Island, New York, by using maximum-stage gages: U.S. Geological Survey Journal of Research, v. 6, no. 1, p. 11-21.

Busciolano, Ronald, 2005, Statistical analysis of long-term hydrologic records for selection of drought-monitoring sites on Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2004-5152, 47 p., online only.

Buxton, H.T., 1985, Estimating average annual base flow at low-flow partial-record stations, Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4240, 32 p.

Buxton, H.T. and Reilly, T.E., 1985, Effects of sanitary sewers on ground-water levels and streams in Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York, Part 2, development and application of southwest Suffolk County model: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 83-4209, 39 p.

Harbaugh, A.W. and Getzen, R.T., 1977, Stream simulation in an analog model of the ground-water system on Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 77-58, 15 p.

Koch, Ellis, 1970, Effects of urbanization on the quality of selected streams in southern Nassau County, Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 700-C, P. C189-C192.

Koenig, T.A., Bruce, J.L., O’Connor, J.E., McGee, B.D., Holmes, R.R., Jr., Hollins, Ryan, Forbes, B.T., Kohn, M.S., Schellekens, M.F., Martin, Z.W., and Peppler, M.C., 2016, Identifying and preserving high-water mark data: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, book 3, chap. A24, 47 p.

Konrad, Christopher P., 2003, Effects of Urban Development on Floods: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 076-03, 4p.

Ku, H.F.H. and Simmons, D.L., 1981, Base flow of streams in Nassau County Sewer Districts 2 and 3, Long Island, New York, 1978-79: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 81-420, 32 p.

Ku, H.F.H. and Simmons, D.L., 1984, Quality and quantity of urban stormwater runoff to recharge basins, Long Island, New York: in U.S. Geological Survey, 1984, Geological Survey Research, Fiscal Year 1981: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1375, p. 103.

Misut, P.E. and Monti, Jack, Jr., 2016, Delineation of areas contributing groundwater to selected receiving surface water bodies for long-term average hydrologic conditions from 1968 to 1983 for Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5138, 22 p.

Olson S.A. and Norris M.J., 2007, U.S. Geological Survey Streamgaging…from the National Streamflow Information Program: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2005-3131, 4 p.

Pluhowski, E.J. and Spinello, A.G., 1978, Impact of sewerage systems on stream base flow and ground-water recharge on Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Journal of Research, v. 6, no. 2, p. 263-271.

Prince, K.R., 1980, Preliminary investigation of a shallow ground-water flow system associated with Connetquot Brook, Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 80-47, 37 p.

Prince, K.R., 1981, Use of flow-duration curves to evaluate effects of urbanization on streamflow patterns on Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 80-114, 19 p.

Reilly, T.E. and Buxton, H.T., 1985, Effects of sanitary sewering on ground-water levels and streams in Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York, part 3; development and application of southern U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 83-4210, 41 p.

Reynolds, R.J., 1982, Base flow of streams on Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 81-48, 33 p.

Sauer, V.B., and Turnipseed, D.P., 2010, Stage measurement at gaging stations: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods book 3, chap. A7, 45 p.

Seaburn, G.E., 1970, Preliminary analysis of rate of movement of storm runoff through the zone of aeration beneath a recharge basin on Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 700-B, p. B196-B198.

Seaburn, G.E., 1969, Effects of urban development on direct runoff to East Meadow Brook, Nassau County, Long Island, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 627-B, 14 p.

Spinello, A.G. and Simmons, D.L., 1992, Base flow of 10 south-shore streams, Long Island, New York, 1976-85, and the effects of urbanization on base flow and flow duration: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 90-4205, 34 p.

Sulam, D.J., 1980, Delineation of ground-water contributing areas of streams of southwest Suffolk County, New York: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 80-346, 4 p.

Turnipseed, D.P., and Sauer, V.B., 2010, Discharge measurements at gaging stations: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods book 3, chap. A8, 87 p.