Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center

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Water information is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and effective management of water resources. The USGS works with partners in Oklahoma and Texas to monitor, assess, conduct targeted research, and deliver information on a wide range of water resources including streamflow, groundwater, water quality, and water use and availability.

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Oklahoma-Texas Water Dashboard

Oklahoma-Texas Water Dashboard

View over 850 USGS real-time stream, lake, reservoir, precipitation, water quality and groundwater stations in context with current weather and hazard conditions!

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Water On-The-Go

Water On-The-Go

Map-based mobile web application that gives Texans easy access to current conditions in streams near them.

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News

Date published: September 8, 2021

Online tool updated with new features to help Texans during flooding

An interactive online tool that can help Texans prepare and respond to flooding events has ­newly added capabilities to help inform state and local flood management decisions that can help protect life and property.

Date published: September 7, 2021

Southeast Region (SER) Science Workshop: Identifying Science to Meet Administration Priorities and the Needs of Our Stakeholders

The fourth annual SER Science Workshop, held virtually July 13-16, 2021, addressed four administration priorities – underserved communities, tribal engagement, conserving 30% of our lands and waters by 2030, and tackling the climate crisis. 

Date published: June 10, 2021

OTWSC Webinar, Friday July 16th - USGS National Water Dashboard

USGS National Water Dashboard: Modern Water Data Delivery for the Next Decade 

USGS Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center Webinar Series - Friday July 16, 11 am Central

Publications

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Year Published: 2021

Cimarron River alluvial aquifer hydrogeologic framework, water budget, and implications for future water availability in the Pawnee Nation Tribal jurisdictional area, Payne County, Oklahoma, 2016–18

The Cimarron River is a free-flowing river and is a major source of water as it flows across Oklahoma. Increased demand for water resources within the Cimarron River alluvial aquifer in north-central Oklahoma (primarily in Payne County) has led to increases in groundwater withdrawals for agriculture, public, irrigation, industrial, and domestic...

Paizis, Nicole C.; Trevisan, Adam R.
Paizis, N.C., and Trevisan, A.R., 2021, Cimarron River alluvial aquifer hydrogeologic framework, water budget, and implications for future water availability in the Pawnee Nation Tribal jurisdictional area, Payne County, Oklahoma, 2016–18: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5073, 49 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215073.

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Year Published: 2021

Estimates of public-supply, domestic, and irrigation water withdrawal, use, and trends in the Upper Rio Grande Basin, 1985 to 2015

The Rio Grande flows approximately 670 miles from its headwaters in the San Juan Mountains of south-central Colorado to Fort Quitman, Texas, draining the Upper Rio Grande Basin (URGB) study area of 32,000 square miles that includes parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. Parts of the basin extend into the United Mexican States (hereafter “Mexico...

Ivahnenko, Tamara I.; Flickinger, Allison K.; Galanter, Amy E.; Douglas-Mankin, Kyle R.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Senay, Gabriel B.
Ivahnenko, T.I., Flickinger, A.K., Galanter, A.E., Douglas-Mankin, K.R., Pedraza, D.E., and Senay, G.B., 2021, Estimates of public-supply, domestic, and irrigation water withdrawal, use, and trends in the Upper Rio Grande Basin, 1985 to 2015: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5036, 31 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215036.

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Year Published: 2021

Extreme precipitation and flooding contribute to sudden vegetation dieback in a coastal salt marsh

Climate extremes are becoming more frequent with global climate change and have the potential to cause major ecological regime shifts. Along the northern Gulf of Mexico, a coastal wetland in Texas suffered sudden vegetation dieback following an extreme precipitation and flooding event associated with Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Historical salt marsh...

Stagg, Camille; Osland, Michael; Moon, Jena A.; Feher, Laura; Laurenzano, Claudia; Lane, Tiffany C.; Jones, William; Hartley, Stephen