Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

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Wildfires, Sediment, and Water Supplies

Wildfires, Sediment, and Water Supplies

In the year after the Carr Fire in northern California, USGS researchers found that greater-than-average precipitation moved large sediment loads through watersheds, which can jeopardize water supplies.

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Sound Waves Newsletter

Sound Waves Newsletter

Coastal and marine research news from across the USGS: Read our stories on coastal hazards, deep-sea research, preserving coral reefs, and more.

Sound Waves
Filter Total Items: 372
Date published: October 21, 2016

New Maps from Old Photos: Measuring Coastal Erosion

U.S. Geological Survey scientists and their coauthors from the California Coastal Records Project have found a way to use historical aerial photographs not just to see evidence of coastal erosion, but to accurately measure how much has occurred over time.

Date published: September 30, 2016

Sound Waves Newsletter - August-September 2016

USGS helps the Government of India discover large, highly enriched, producible accumulations of natural gas hydrate in the Bay of Bengal, USGS re-evaluates the causes and hazards of South Carolina earthquakes, and more in this August-September issue of Sound Waves.

Date published: September 13, 2016

International Recognition for Historic Elwha River Restoration

NEW DELHI, INDIA – The collaborative work of the U.S. Department of the Interior and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to restore the Elwha River of Washington, USA was recognized as a world-renowned restoration project during the awarding of the 2016 Thiess International Riverprize.

Date published: June 16, 2016

Atlantic Methane Seeps Surprise Scientists

Recent scientific work has confirmed the source, composition and origin of methane seeps on the Atlantic Ocean seafloor, discovered in 2012, where scientists never expected them to be.

Date published: June 14, 2016

Studying Recent Tsunami Deposits in Icy Bay, Alaska

On October 17, 2015, a rain-soaked mountainside slid into Taan Fiord on Icy Bay, sending a giant wave more than 500 feet up the opposite slope.

Date published: March 29, 2016

New Maps Illuminate Monterey Bay Area Seafloor

Six new sets of maps reveal the diverse and complex range of seafloor habitats along 130 kilometers (80 miles) of the central California coast from the Monterey Peninsula north to Pigeon Point. The publicly available maps can be used by a large stakeholder community to understand and manage California’s vast and valuable marine resources. 

Date published: July 22, 2015

Climate Change Reduces Coral Reefs’ Ability to Protect Coasts

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Coral reefs, under pressure from climate change and direct human activity, may have a reduced ability to protect tropical islands against wave attack, erosion and salinization of drinking water resources, which help to sustain life on those islands.