Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Wetlands

Filter Total Items: 5
Date published: September 29, 2021
Status: Active

Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound

A Pacific Northwest icon, Puget Sound is the second-largest estuary in the United States. Its unique geology, climate, and nutrient-rich waters produce and sustain biologically productive coastal habitats. These same natural characteristics also contribute to a high quality of life that has led to growth in human population and urbanization. This growth has played a role in degrading the Sound...

Date published: September 15, 2021
Status: Active

Sediment Transport in Coastal Environments

Our research goals are to provide the scientific information, knowledge, and tools required to ensure that decisions about land and resource use, management practices, and future development in the coastal zone and adjacent watersheds can be evaluated with a complete understanding of the probable effects on coastal ecosystems and communities, and a full assessment of their vulnerability to...

Date published: December 16, 2020
Status: Active

Estuaries and large river deltas in the Pacific Northwest

Essential habitat for wild salmon and other wildlife borders river deltas and estuaries in the Pacific Northwest. These estuaries also support industry, agriculture, and a large human population that’s expected to double by the year 2060, but each could suffer from more severe river floods, higher sea level, and storm surges caused by climate change.

Date published: November 17, 2020
Status: Active

Trace Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory

In the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center’s Trace Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory in Santa Cruz, California, we have an ultrapurification water system, CEM MarsX, and two Class-100 laminar air flow benches for sediment-geochemical provenance studies and organic matter sourcing.

Date published: November 5, 2020
Status: Active

Core X-Ray: 3-D CT Core Imaging Laboratory

The Geotek RXCT, a "rotating x-ray computed tomography" system, creates ultra high-resolution imagery of sediment cores. The system resides at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California. It requires the operator to take specialized training and hold X-ray radiation and safety certifications.