Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

Multimedia

Please enjoy these images of the wildlife and landscapes PIERC studies throughout the Pacific Islands

Filter Total Items: 89
Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens).
March 12, 2020

Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens).

Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens).

Ohia forest with dieback resulting from Rapid Ohia Death, Hawaii Island.
December 31, 2019

Ohia forest with dieback

Aerial photo of ʻōhiʻa forest on Hawaii Island, including dieback resulting from Rapid Ohia Death.

Ohia seedlings in dibble tubes, prior to planting
December 31, 2019

Ohia seedlings before planting

ʻŌhiʻa seedlings in dibble tubes, prior to planting.

'I'iwi (Drepanis coccinea).
April 15, 2019

'I'iwi (Drepanis coccinea), or scarlet honeycreeper.

'I'iwi (Drepanis coccinea), or scarlet honeycreeper.

Coqui frog sitting on a red Ti plant leaf
April 1, 2019

Coqui frog on a red ti leaf

A coqui frog sits on a red ti leaf, next to a quarter for scale. Native to Puerto Rico, coqui frogs are an invasive species in Hawaii.

Coqui frog on red ti plant leaf
April 1, 2019

Coqui frog on a red ti plant leaf

A coqui frog rests on a red ti plant leaf. Native to Puerto Rico, coqui are an invasive species in Hawaii.

Image of wind turbine towering over trees
December 31, 2018

Wind turbine towering over trees

A wind turbine rising above Oʻahu trees forms part of a wind energy installation where USGS bat research is taking place.

Equipment set up on the ground below a wind turbine.
December 31, 2018

Equipment set up at wind energy site

Bat detection and monitoring equipment set up below a turbine at an Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi wind energy site.

Wind turbines and trees against sky at sunset.
December 31, 2018

Windmills at sunset, Oʻahu

Turbines at a wind energy site on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi.

Feral pigs approach out of the forest, Hilo Hawaii.
July 27, 2018

Feral pigs approach the road next to a forested area in Hilo, Hawaii

A group of feral pigs leaves the forest and approaches the photographer at the side of the road. Many parts of Hilo and Hawaii Island are experiencing increased interaction with feral wildlife.

July 11, 2018

Four Examples of Nest Predation by Rats - Hawaii Volcanoes National

Black rats were unintentionally introduced to Hawai’i in the late 1800s, most likely as hitchhikers on trading vessels. Since their introduction, they have disrupted native ecosystems by destroying native plants, eating native arthropods, and depredating bird nests. Black rats have contributed to population declines and species extinctions of Hawaiian forest birds, and