Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

Multimedia

Please enjoy these images of the wildlife and landscapes PIERC studies throughout the Pacific Islands

Filter Total Items: 62
Coqui frog sitting on a red Ti plant leaf
April 1, 2019

Coqui frog on a red ti leaf

A coqui frog sits on a red ti leaf, next to a quarter for scale. Native to Puerto Rico, coqui frogs are an invasive species in Hawaii.

Coqui frog on red ti plant leaf
April 1, 2019

Coqui frog on a red ti plant leaf

A coqui frog rests on a red ti plant leaf. Native to Puerto Rico, coqui are an invasive species in Hawaii.

Image of wind turbine towering over trees
December 31, 2018

Wind turbine towering over trees

A wind turbine rising above Oʻahu trees forms part of a wind energy installation where USGS bat research is taking place.

Equipment set up on the ground below a wind turbine.
December 31, 2018

Equipment set up at wind energy site

Bat detection and monitoring equipment set up below a turbine at an Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi wind energy site.

Wind turbines and trees against sky at sunset.
December 31, 2018

Windmills at sunset, Oʻahu

Turbines at a wind energy site on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi.

Image of yellow bat against blue and red background.
November 9, 2018

Near-infrared image of a bat in flight

A near-infrared image of a Hawaiian Hoary bat in flight is part of a project to measure bat activity on a wind energy site on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi.

Feral pigs approach out of the forest, Hilo Hawaii.
July 27, 2018

Feral pigs approach the road next to a forested area in Hilo, Hawaii

A group of feral pigs leaves the forest and approaches the photographer at the side of the road. Many parts of Hilo and Hawaii Island are experiencing increased interaction with feral wildlife.

July 11, 2018

Four Examples of Nest Predation by Rats - Hawaii Volcanoes National

Black rats were unintentionally introduced to Hawai’i in the late 1800s, most likely as hitchhikers on trading vessels. Since their introduction, they have disrupted native ecosystems by destroying native plants, eating native arthropods, and depredating bird nests. Black rats have contributed to population declines and species extinctions of Hawaiian forest birds, and

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July 11, 2018

Four Examples of Nest Predation by Rats (Short)

Black rats were unintentionally introduced to Hawai’i in the late 1800s, most likely as hitchhikers on trading vessels. Since their introduction, they have disrupted native ecosystems by destroying native plants, eating native arthropods, and depredating bird nests. Black rats have contributed to population declines and species extinctions of Hawaiian forest birds, and

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Geneticist in lab using a pipette to extract a sample from a centrifuge tube
January 17, 2018

Geneticist extracts DNA from samples to detect fungal pathogen

Geneticist, Kylle Roy, extracts DNA from samples to detect Ceratocystis, a fungal pathogen that causes Rapid Ohia Death. Samples have been acquired using aerial spore traps, by collecting wood shavings from ohia trees, or by collecting frass (excrement) of wood-boring beetles.

Air sampling station in a grassy field with ocean in background
December 26, 2017

Air sampling station on the Hāmākua Coast on the island of Hawai‘i

A trap designed for collecting airborne particulates deployed on the Hāmākua Coast of the island of Hawai‘i. The traps appear to be an effective method for monitoring airborne fungal spores as hundreds of fungal taxa were identified from a handful of samples screened by second generation sequencing.

An ohia tree log showing tunnels created by wood boring beetles
December 15, 2017

Inside of an ohia log with tunnels created by wood boring beetles

Wood boring beetle tunnels inside of an ‘ōhi‘a log. Researchers are investigating if the spread of beetle frass (excrement) is a pathway for movement of a fungus that causes Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.