Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Apple Snail

Native to South America, the Apple snail was likely introduced to the Southeast United States by way of the aquarium trade. Certain species are established in Florida, Georgia, Texas, and Louisiana, which is of concern as they have the potential to negatively impact wetland and aquatic ecosystems, agricultural crops, and human health – as they can carry parasites. Apple snails can grow to 6 inches high, and are found in freshwater lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, and ditches. Their presence is often indicated by the bright pink egg masses that consist of hundreds, if not thousands of individual eggs.
Filter Total Items: 4
Date published: May 10, 2018
Status: Active

Joint Ecosystem Modeling: EverSnail

EverSnail, developed in collaboration with the University of West Florida, is an age- and size-structured spatially-explicit landscape model of native apple snails (Pomacea paludosa).

Date published: August 1, 2017
Status: Active

Pilot Testing and Protocol Development of Apple Snail Suppression at Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge

The maculata apple snail (Pomacea maculata) has invaded many coastal and some inland areas in south Louisiana. Reports have indicated that the freshwater snails have significantly reduced the amount of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and floating leaved vegetation (FLV) available for waterfowl and other wildlife.

Date published: September 15, 2016

Determining the Efficacy of Agricultural Oils for Suppressing Applesnail Egg Mass Hatch-out

Maculata applesnails (Pomacea maculata) are exotic freshwater snails that have been widely introduced along the Gulf of Mexico coast. The snails can significantly impact freshwater macrophytes and reduce the quality of water bodies.

Date published: August 25, 2016

Movement of Maculata Applesnails in Southern Louisiana Swamps

Maculata applesnails (Pomacea maculata) are exotic freshwater snails that have been widely introduced along the Gulf of Mexico coast. They can significantly impact freshwater macrophytes and reduce water quality.