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Sediment biogeochemistry and subsequent mercury biomagnification in wetland food webs of the San Francisco Bay, CA

April 5, 2021

Methylmercury (MeHg) is a globally pervasive contaminant that biomagnifies in food webs and can reach toxic concentrations in consumers at higher trophic levels, including wildlife and humans. The production of MeHg, and its subsequent entry and biomagnification in food webs, is governed by a complex suite of biogeochemical, physical, and ecological processes, resulting in variation in the distribution of MeHg among regions and individuals. To better understand spatial variation in MeHg bioaccumulation within a species, we evaluated the effects of habitat biogeochemistry, food web structure, and diet composition in the wetland-obligate California black rail (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) at three wetlands along the Petaluma River in northern San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

These data support the following publication:
Hall, L.A., Woo, I., Marvin-DiPasquale, M., Tsao, D.C., Krabbenhoft, D.P., Takekawa, J.Y. and De La Cruz, S.E., 2019. Disentangling the effects of habitat biogeochemistry, food web structure, and diet composition on mercury bioaccumulation in a wetland bird. Environmental Pollution, p.113280. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.113280