Invasive Species Program

Invasive Animals

Invasive animals including mammals, reptiles, fish, birds and other organisms enter the United States through a variety of pathways both within the U.S. and nationally. USGS invasive species research encompasses all significant groups of invasive organisms in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems throughout the U.S.

Filter Total Items: 61
Date published: August 6, 2019
Status: Completed

Treasure Coast and Central Florida Fish Slams- 2019

In March and June 2019, USGS researchers joined partners in Treasure Coast and Central Florida where they sampled freshwater bodies for non-native fishes. The bi-annual Fish Slam event helps monitor new introductions and document range expansion of known non-native fishes. 

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

A Structured Decision-Making Framework for Controlling, Monitoring, and Containment of Invasive Species through Trapping: An Application to the Argentine Black and White Tegu

USGS is applying decision analysis to identify cost-effective methods for controlling invasive species like the Argentine black and white tegu.

Date published: October 12, 2018
Status: Active

New Technologies and Groundwork for Mosquito Control in the Alakai Plateau

Introduced mosquito-borne avian diseases, avian pox and avian malaria, are key limiting factors for endemic Hawaiian forest birds and are, in part, likely responsible for past extinctions and the continued decline of extant species populations.  In the last 40 years on the island of Kaua‘i a number of species have become increasingly rare and several are now presumed extinct. Coinciding with...

Date published: May 23, 2018
Status: Active

Invasive Fish

Invasive fish cause significant economic losses and diminish opportunities for beneficial
uses of valued aquatic resources. Costly effects include harm to fisheries (e.g., Asian carp, snakeheads, whirling disease, and hemorrhagic septicemia). USGS research is focused on invasive fish spread and distribution, genetic and population impacts of invasives, hybridization between native and non...

Contacts: Earl Campbell
Date published: May 21, 2018
Status: Active

Invasive Insects

Invasive species often pose the primary threat to biodiversity in the Pacific. USGS research focuses on the ecology, reducing impacts, and controlling highly invasive insect species. For example, USGS scientists are assessing novel mosquito control tools (e.g., bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia). Mosquitoes carry diseases that affect people (e.g., West Nile virus, dengue); therefore, the...

Contacts: Earl Campbell
Date published: May 21, 2018
Status: Active

Invasive Mussels

Invasive zebra and quagga mussels (collectively called dreissenid mussels) are causing significant ecological and economic impacts and the range of these impacts continues to increase as they spread across North America. Dreissenids affect industrial and municipal infrastructure, recreational water users, and they severely alter aquatic ecosystems. USGS has been conducting dreissenid mussel...

Contacts: Earl Campbell
Date published: May 21, 2018
Status: Active

Invasive Mammals

Understanding life history and the environmental requirements, tolerances, and thresholds  of invasive species is critical to developing effective control and management options. The USGS conducts research on the biology of many species including Nutria and feral pigs to provide the information needed by management agencies.

 

Contacts: Earl Campbell
Date published: May 20, 2018
Status: Active

Invasive Reptiles

Invasive species have negatively impacted many ecosystems. Invasive reptiles are an increasing problem across the United States. Tracking the establishment and spread of existing and new invasive species is critical to effectively manage invasive species. USGS scientists are developing new tools, particularly molecular techniques, to assist in the early detection of, and rapid response to, ...

Contacts: Earl Campbell
Date published: May 17, 2018
Status: Active

Asian Carp

The negative effects of invasive Asian carp to the Nation’s waterways are far reaching and have potential to expand and intensify. USGS is delivering data, tools and technologies to partners to keep these invasive fish out of the Great Lakes and other aquatic ecosystems and control them where they occur in the Ohio River and Mississippi River Basins.

Contacts: Earl Campbell
Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Forensic Markers of Lampricide Toxicity & Mortality in Non-Target Fishes

The pesticides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol  (TFM) and niclosamide selectively target larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) because they have a much lower capacity to detoxify these lampricides by forming glucuronide conjugates compared to typical non-target fishes.  However, if lampricide uptake overwhelms a fish's detoxification capacity, non-target mortality can result.  Non-target...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Avoidance behavior of larval sea lampreys in response to Bayluscide® as an evaluation of the utility of a Bayluscide® bar formulation in sea lamprey control operations

This study will be conducted to provide information on the avoidance behavior of larval sea lampreys in response to the lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2’,5-dichloro-4’-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide).  The data generated will be used to evaluate the feasibility of developing a new lampricide formulation (Bayluscide® Solid Bar) for use in the Great Lakes...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluation of the toxicity of niclosamide to two fresh water mussel species and larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) when exposed to granular Bayluscide

Niclosamide (5-chloro-N-[2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl]-2-hydroxybenzamide; NIC) is the active ingredient in the 3.2% granular formulation of Bayluscide® (gB). is applied to assess populations of Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larva that are too deep to electro fish or remove larva in habitats and too large to treat with liquid formulations of lampricides in a cost effective manner.  Concerns...