Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program

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Read Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program news from coast to coast!

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Date published: July 31, 2017

Massachusetts Senate Visits the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center

Members and staff of the Massachusetts State Senate visited the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center with specific requests to discuss economic-development issues around topics including offshore wind energy, sea-level rise impacts, storm preparedness, beach erosion, and wetland loss.

Date published: July 31, 2017

Recent Coastal and Marine Fieldwork - June-July 2017

USGS scientists visited more than 26 locations in the last two months, studying the ocean floor near landslides, collecting coral cores to study land-use changes, comparing airplanes and drones for mapping, and much more.

Date published: July 14, 2017

USGS maps underwater part of Big Sur landslide at Mud Creek

Scientists from the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center mapped the offshore extent of the Mud Creek landslide on California’s Big Sur coast on July 11, 2017.

Date published: July 11, 2017

Huge landslide on California’s Big Sur coast continues to change

The Mud Creek landslide on California’s Big Sur coast keeps eroding.

Date published: June 19, 2017

Preparing for the Storm: Predicting Where Our Coasts Are at Risk

Living in the Outer Banks means living with the power of the sea. Jutting out from North Carolina’s coast into the Atlantic Ocean, this series of sandy barrier islands is particularly vulnerable to damage from major storms. In April 2016, another nor’easter was set to strike, but this time, Dare County officials were approached by their local weather forecaster with a new kind of prediction.

Date published: May 31, 2017

Disappearing Beaches: Modeling Shoreline Change in Southern California

Southern California could lose up to two-thirds of its beaches by 2100, if sea level rises 3 to 6 feet (0.9 to 1.8 meters) and human intervention is limited, according to a study conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey and recently published in the Journal of Geophysical Research–Earth Surface.

Date published: May 31, 2017

Recent Publications - May 2017

List of USGS publications based on coastal and marine research, published in May of 2017.

Date published: May 31, 2017

News Briefs - May 2017

Coastal and marine news highlights from across the USGS

This article is part of the May 2017 issue of the Sound Waves newsletter.

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Date published: May 31, 2017

USGS Seafloor-Mapping Expert Sam Johnson is Keynote Speaker at Geological Conference in South Africa

The geological survey of South Africa invited research geologist Sam Johnson of the USGS PCMSC to participate in a workshop, and conference, held in March 2017 in Pretoria; and Johnson to share his insights as a leader of the California Seafloor Mapping Program. 

Date published: May 31, 2017

Sound Waves Newsletter - May 2017

Scientists prepare for hurricane season with new tools and data, southern California could lose up to two-thirds of its beaches by 2100, real-time public engagement during deep-water remotely operated vehicle dives, PCMSC women’s panel discuss their careers to inspire girls, Sam Johnson is keynote speaker at geological conference in South Africa, and more in this May 2017 issue of Sound Waves...

May 31, 2017

Sound Waves Newsletter - May 2017

Scientists prepare for hurricane season with new tools and data, southern California could lose up to two-thirds of its beaches by 2100, real-time public engagement during deep-water remotely operated vehicle dives, PCMSC women’s panel discuss their careers to inspire girls, Sam Johnson is keynote speaker at geological conference in South Africa, and more in this May 2017 issue of Sound Waves. 

Date published: May 31, 2017

Scientists Prepare for Hurricane Season with New Tools and Data that Advance Forecasting of Storm Impacts

As hurricane season officially begins, scientists with the USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards (NACCH) project are ready to provide scientific information, data, and tools to guide hurricane response and recovery efforts for U.S. shorelines.