Earthquake Hazards

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July 17, 2019

ShakeAlert Sensor and Station

This is b-roll footage of a ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system seismic station. These seismic stations and sensors are deployed around California and are used to monitor earthquake activity.
 

two women making measurements of a rupture in the ground surface
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS scientists Beth Haddon (left) and Jaime Delano (right) measuring an offset road at the site of the Ridgecrest earthquake sequence rupture. Photo credit: Chris DuRoss, USGS

A woman makes notes while overlooking earth ruptures in ground on a dirt road
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS scientist Jessie Thompson Jobe collects and records information on earthquake surface ruptures observed along a roadway following the Ridgecrest earthquake sequence. Photo credit: Ryan Gold (USGS)

two people working with instruments in an arid area
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS Geophysicists Elizabeth Cochran and Nick VanDerElst install a seismometer on the base Photo credit: Ben Brooks, USGS

A woman holds a tape measure across a rupture in the ground
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS scientist Jessie Thompson Jobe measures fault offset at the site of the Ridgecrest earthquake sequence rupture. Photo credit: Chris DuRoss, USGS

a woman crouches in the field near newly made sand deposits
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS scientist Jaime Delano, observes a sand blow caused by liquefaction during the M7.1 Ridgecrest earthquake. Photo credit: Chris DuRoss

a woman with a GPS antenna kneels along an exposed rock face that is being measured
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

Kate Scharer examining striations along fault scarp while completing GPS survey of fault rupture.  Here the fault has about 2.6 m of horizontal displacement and 0.5 m of vertical.  The rake of the striations is 47 degrees.  Photo credit: Jamie Delano, USGS

A woman stands along a rupture in the ground surface
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS Pasadena Earthquake Response Coordinator surveys displaced rocks near the southern end of the surface rupture of the 5 July 2019 M7.1 Ridgecrest earthquake.  USGS photograph. Photo credit: Sue Hough, USGS

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July 16, 2019

2019 Ridgecrest Earthquake Sequence: July 4, 2019–July 16, 2019

2019 Ridgecrest Earthquake Sequence 
July 4, 2019–July 16, 2019

3,557 earthquakes recorded since July 4, 2019 above Magnitude 2

M6.4 12km W of Searles Valley, CA
2019-07-04 17:33:49 (UTC)
51,000+ responses via Did You Feel It?

M7.1 18km W of Searles Valley, CA
2019-07-06 03:19:53

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A woman walks along a rupture in the ground
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

USGS Pasadena Earthquake Response Coordinator Sue Hough, surveys displaced rocks near the southern end of the surface rupture of the 5 July 2019 M7.1 Ridgecrest earthquake.  Photo credit: Sue Hough, USGS

A woman and two men inspect and measure a large crack in the earth's surface
July 16, 2019

Women in Science - Responding to Ridgecrest, CA earthquake July 2019

Geologists with USGS, the California Geological Survey (CGS) and Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake (NAWS) worked together in response to the Ridgecrest earthquake sequence in California that occurred July 4-6, 2019. The earthquakes were large enough that the fault rupture reached the earth’s surface. Here, research geologist Belle Philibosian was part of a USGS field

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July 12, 2019

Animation of Ridgecrest Foreshock Seq up to M7.1 (Prelim. Results)

This animation shows preliminary results from precise relocation of the Ridgecrest foreshock sequence, up to the the time of occurrence of the M 7.1 mainshock.  The animation begins in a map view and then transitions into a rotating vertical slice.  Earthquakes are colorcoded by time of occurrence, with early events in dark blue and later events (up to the M 7.1) in dark

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