Earthquake Hazards

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Filter Total Items: 109
Date published: October 15, 2014

Media Advisory: Washington National Cathedral to Host Earthquake Experts

Three years after a magnitude 5.8 earthquake caused $25 million worth of damage to its pinnacles, buttresses and ceilings, the Washington National Cathedral will host earthquake experts from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the Great ShakeOut earthquake drill. 

Date published: October 14, 2014

Seismometers to Measure DC Shaking

Thirty seismometers are being installed in the Nation’s capital this winter to monitor ground tremors to better estimate the intensity of ground shaking that can be expected during future earthquakes in the area.

Date published: October 9, 2014

Media Advisory: Experts Gather in Advance of National Earthquake Drill

A press conference will be held on October 14, 2014 in recognition of the upcoming International ShakeOut Day of Action. On October 16, nearly 25 million people (2 million in the SouthEast region) are expected to participate in the world’s largest earthquake drill.

Attribution: Earthquake Hazards
Date published: August 13, 2014

Recent Chilean Earthquakes Signal Potential for Similar Future Events

Despite the magnitude 8.2 earthquake that hit northern Chile in April 2014, the plate boundary in that region is still capable of hosting shocks of the same size or even greater in the near future, according to new research presented in Nature. 

Date published: May 6, 2014

Record Number of Oklahoma Tremors Raises Possibility of Damaging Earthquakes

The rate of earthquakes in Oklahoma has increased by about 50 percent since October 2013, significantly increasing the chance for a damaging quake in central Oklahoma. 

Date published: March 20, 2014

The Science Behind the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake and Tsunami

Why does the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Matter 50 Years Later? Scientific experts will talk about a half-century of scientific and monitoring advances triggered by the 1964 events.

Date published: March 6, 2014

2011 Oklahoma Induced Earthquake May Have Triggered Larger Quake

 In a new study involving researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists observed that a human-induced magnitude 5.0 earthquake near Prague, Oklahoma in November 2011 may have triggered the larger M5.7 earthquake less than a day later. 

Attribution: Earthquake Hazards
Date published: February 20, 2014

Media Advisory: USGS to Host Congressional Briefing: Earthquake Science and Remaining Mysteries

It's 1964 in Alaska. Imagine 4.5 minutes of powerful ground shaking underneath you from a magnitude 9.2 earthquake. You and your loved ones are then faced with resulting landslides and a devastating tsunami. You just experienced the largest earthquake ever recorded in North America. 

Date published: January 23, 2014

Threat of Earthquakes Occurring in Central United States Still Alive

Earthquake activity in the New Madrid Seismic Zone in the central United States does not seem to be slowing down.  In a new study published in the journal "Science," seismologists Morgan Page and Susan Hough of the U.S. Geological Survey investigate whether current quakes in the region could be aftershocks of large earthquakes that occurred 200 years earlier.

Date published: January 15, 2014

20 Years After Northridge Quake, Buildings Remain Vulnerable

Twenty years ago this week an earthquake struck Northridge, Calif., killing 57 people and revealing a serious defect in a common type of mid-rise building. A new study by U.S. Geological Survey and Caltech engineers, shows that these mid-rise buildings with fracture-prone welds in their steel frames are much more dangerous than they would be if they met current standards.

Date published: January 8, 2014

New Sensor Network to Detail Virginia Earthquakes

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Virginia Tech will install a 20-station seismic network in the central Virginia area beginning Jan. 8. The new sensors – each about the size of a soda can – will provide information to help the researchers study the background seismicity in the area and any continuing aftershocks of the Aug. 23, 2011 earthquake near Louisa and Mineral, Va.

Date published: January 8, 2014

Stories of Lava Flows and Volcanic Landscapes from Ka`ū to North Kona Featured in Public Talk

The lava flows and volcanic landscapes along Māmalahoa and Queen Ka‘ahumanu Highways, from Ka‘ū to North Kona, will be the focus of a public talk offered by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists on Wed., Jan. 22.