Cascades Volcano Observatory

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Monitoring for volcanic gases at Newberry Volcano
August 3, 2020

A MultiGAS instrument measures gases at Newberry Volcano

Scientists use a MultiGAS instrument (gray, hard-shell case) to measure gas compositions from the East Lake hot spring in the Newberry caldera. The photo was taken on August 3, 2020 just after sunrise. The vapor above the hot spring and lake is typical for cool mornings and is not visible later in the day.

June 19, 2020

Lahar Detection System Developments at Mount Rainier

The video describes USGS efforts to improve lahar (mudflow) monitoring at Mount Rainier, an ice-clad volcano in Washington State with potential for dangerous volcanic mudflows. The presentation was given to colleagues in the US and in Ecuador by Andy Lockhart. Andy is a geophysicist with the the USGS/USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, and he has worked to reduce

Depth of earthquakes at Mount Rainier 2010 to 2019
December 19, 2019

Mount Rainier: Earthquakes in the Hydrothermal System

Earthquakes at Mount Rainier from 2010 to 2019. As shown in the graphic, fluids from the magmatic system beneath the volcano rise through existing cracks and weaknesses in the crust. Along with rainwater and ice/snow melt, these fluids combine to create a hydrothermal system within the volcano. When pressurized fluids move along faults in the shallow subsurface, they

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August 26, 2019

“Science is amazing”: GeoGirls explore Mount St. Helens

During Aug. 4-8, 2019, U.S. Geological Survey women scientists, university researchers and Mount St. Helens Institute staff led 25 middle-school girls from Washington and Oregon in the fifth annual “GeoGirls” outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, Washington.
 

Girls standing in a large circle around a volcano monitoring station
August 5, 2019

The GeoGirls Visit a Volcano Monitoring Station at Mount St. Helens

The GeoGirls visit a volcano monitoring station on the east side of Mount St. Helens, finding out how scientists use different monitoring methods (seismic, GPS, tiltmeter) to understand more about the volcano.

GeoGirls 2019 group photo, with Mount St. Helens in the background
August 5, 2019

GeoGirls 2019 Group Photo

GeoGirls 2019 group photo, with Mount St. Helens in the background.

Girls hike along a trail at Mount St. Helens
August 5, 2019

GeoGirls Hike the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens

The GeoGirls hike the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens, examining lava outcrops and volcanic sediment.

Girls stand in circle with one pointing a paper on the ground
August 5, 2019

The GeoGirls Create Field Drawings

The GeoGirls create field drawings of 1980 pyroclastic flow deposits on Mount St. Helens’ Pumice Plain.

Girls stand in stream and take measurements
August 5, 2019

GeoGirls Hike to Willow Creek

GeoGirls hike to Willow Creek, on Mount St. Helens’ Pumice Plain, to learn more about the ecology of the blast zone and how the area has recovered since the catastrophic May 18, 1980, eruption. Here, they look at stream characteristics and how it has influenced the return of life to the area.

People standing with lights in a dark cave
August 4, 2019

GeoGirls Venture into Ape Cave

GeoGirls venture into Ape Cave, a 2,000-year-old lava tube on the south flank of Mount St. Helens, as they learn about Mount St. Helens’ eruptive history and lava flows.

Girls stand in cave with headlamps lighting a book
August 4, 2019

GeoGirls Venture into Ape Cave II

GeoGirls venture into Ape Cave, a 2,000-year-old lava tube on the south flank of Mount St. Helens, as they learn about Mount St. Helens’ eruptive history and lava flows.