Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Multimedia

Use the search options below to filter multimedia. 

Examples: 

  • Webcams—Near-real-time images from webcams.
  • Videos—Collection of videos recorded during field excursions or caught on our webcams.
  • Image Galleries—Galleries of images and events with expanded descriptions.

The Kīlauea Photo and Video Chronology and Mauna Loa Photo and Video Chronology webpages also feature photos. 

Filter Total Items: 1,703
March 22, 2006

Shatter Ring on the PKK Lava Tube

(March 20, 2006, 11:30:10 to March 22, 2006, 07:00:16) The flow field feature seen here in profile is a shatter ring. Shatter rings are circular to elliptical volcanic features, typically tens of meters in diameter, that form over active lava tubes (Kauahikaua and others, 2003; Orr, 2011) They are typified by an upraised rim of blocky rubble and a central depression.

US Army helicopter flies over the heads of researchers on Mauna Kea
February 23, 2006

US Army helicopter flies over the heads of researchers on Mauna Kea

A US Army helicopter from Pohakuloa Training Area flies overhead of palila researchers on Mauna Kea volcano, Hawai‘i Island, Hawai‘i. 

November 28, 2005

Lava Delta Collapse at East Lae‘apuki

At 11:10 in the morning on November 28, 2005, the lava delta at the East Lae‘apuki ocean entry, on Hawai‘i's southeastern coast, began to collapse into the ocean. This was not a catastrophic failure of the 13.8-hectare delta, but instead occurred by piecemeal calving of the front of the delta over a period of just less than 5 hours. The collapse removed nearly the entire

Kīlauea Volcano's east Lae‘apuki lava delta after 70-100 m (230-330...
August 27, 2005

Kīlauea's east Lae‘apuki lava delta after 70-100 m (230-330 ft) lon...

Embayment of lava delta shows result of collapse. The initial collapse was large enough to send waves washing over much of the east half of the delta, because visibility was completely lost for almost 20 minutes, due to a steam white-out. Note rocky debris hurled by the waves onto the delta surface in foreground.

Kīlauea Volcano's east Lae‘apuki lava delta pictured hours before i...
August 26, 2005

Kīlauea's east Lae‘apuki lava delta pictured hours before it collap...

Kīlauea Volcano's east Lae‘apuki lava delta pictured hours before it collapsed into the sea over a 90-minute period. White plume marks location of lava entering sea fed by a lava tube within delta.

Lava spilling over sea cliff starts to build new lava delta, Kīlaue...
August 23, 2005

Lava spilling over sea cliff builds new lava delta, Kīlauea

pāhoehoe lava spilling over sea cliff on south coast of Kīlauea Volcano starts to build a new lava delta. Only three days old, the delta grows slowly as lava spreads over fragmented debris and flows that have accumulated on the steep submarine slope.

Tephra-jet explosion at leading edge of an active lava delta, Kīlau...
August 19, 2005

Tephra-jet explosion at leading edge of an active lava delta, Kīlauea

Explosive interaction between lava and seawater blasts a tephra jet consisting of steam, hot water, black tephra, and molten fragments into the air. Such explosions are typically directed toward the sea, but many explosions also send a shower of lava more than 10 to 20 m (33 to 66 ft) inland. Tehpra jets are the most common type of lava-seawater explosion, and typically

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Active lava delta on the south coast of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
August 12, 2005

Active lava delta on the south coast of Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Active lava delta at East Lae‘apuki on the south coast of Kīlauea Volcano. White gas plume (right) marks location of lava entering the sea through a lava tube whose location is shown by blueish fume (left and center). In early August 2005, the delta encompassed an area of about 12 hectares (30 acres). On August 27, about 4.5 hectares (11 acres) of the delta collapsed into

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Radio telemetry tower on Mauna Kea
July 5, 2005

Radio telemetry tower on Mauna Kea

A VHF radio receiving tower is set up on the slopes of Mauna Kea volcano on Hawai‘i Island, Hawai‘i. This setup allowed researchers to track radio tagged palila over large areas to determine where they were spending their time. 

May 10, 2005

Lava Pond Spattering and Overflow at the MLK Vent

(May 10, 2005, 16:20:29 to 18:30:29) After the collapse of the main spatter cone at the MLK vent (see movies "Spatter cone collapse at the MLK vent"), a small lava pond was visible within the new pit. At times, the level of the lava pond rose abruptly, overflowing the rim of the pit. This movie is an example of this and shows the lava surface rising suddenly to overflowing

May 2, 2005

Spatter Cone Collapse at MLK Vent

(May 2, 2005, 05:30:04 to 07:30:02) During spring 2005, activity at the MLK vent, on the southwestern flank of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone, changed from a period of construction to one of destruction. This was highlighted by the collapse of the main MLK spatter cone. The drain-back of lava beneath the spatter cone, following lava extrusion, apparently removed support of the

February 10, 2005

Lava Fountaining from the MLK Vent

(February 9, 2005, 18:00:30 to February 10, 2005, 08:00:31) On February 9, 2005, an increase in lava discharge from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, part of a longer term increase in effusion rate (Miklius and others, 2006), resulted in vigorous spattering and low fountaining from the MLK vent. Before the event, the tallest of the small complex of spatter cones over the MLK vent was about 6–7