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Greater Yellowstone climate assessment: Past, present, and future climate change in the greater Yellowstone watersheds

June 1, 2021

The Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) is one of the last remaining large and nearly intact temperate ecosystems on Earth. GYA was originally defined in the 1970s as the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, which encompassed the minimum range of the grizzly bear. The boundary now includes about 22 million acres (8.9 million ha) in northwestern Wyoming, south central Montana, and eastern Idaho (Figure ES-1). Two national parks, five national forests, three wildlife refuges, 20 counties, and state and private lands lie within the GYA boundary (Figure ES-1). The Tribal Nations of the Eastern Shoshone, Northern Arapaho, Apsa´alooke/Crow, Northern Cheyenne, Shoshone, and Bannock have reservations in and near the Greater Yellowstone Area, and 27 Tribes are formally recognized to have historical connections to the lands and resources of the region. Natural resources sensitive to climate change connect many of the major economic activities of the GYA, including tourism and recreation, agriculture, and energy development.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2021
Title Greater Yellowstone climate assessment: Past, present, and future climate change in the greater Yellowstone watersheds
DOI 10.15788/GYCA2021
Authors Steven W. Hostetler, Cathy Whitlock, Bryan Shuman, David Liefert, Charles Wolf Drimal, Scott Bischke
Publication Type Report
Publication Subtype Organization Series
Series Title Greater Yellowstone Climate Assessment
Series Number
Index ID 70229659
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center