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Utility of aeromagnetic studies for mapping of potentially active faults in two forearc basins: Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska

April 30, 2005

High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys over forearc basins can detect faults and folds in weakly magnetized sediments, thus providing geologic constraints on tectonic evolution and improved understanding of seismic hazards in convergent-margin settings. Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska, provide two case histories. In each lowland region, shallow-source magnetic anomalies are related to active folds and/or faults. Mapping these structures is critical for understanding seismic hazards that face the urban regions of Seattle, Washington, and Anchorage, Alaska. Similarities in aeromagnetic anomaly patterns and magnetic stratigraphy between the two regions suggest that we can expect the aeromagnetic method to yield useful structural information that may contribute to earth-hazard and energy resource investigations in other forearc basins.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2005
Title Utility of aeromagnetic studies for mapping of potentially active faults in two forearc basins: Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska
DOI 10.1186/BF03351857
Authors Richard W. Saltus, Richard J. Blakely, Peter J. Haeussler, Ray Wells
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Earth, Planets and Space
Index ID 70209842
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Alaska Science Center; Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center; Geology, Minerals, Energy, and Geophysics Science Center