Science for a Changing World

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USGS scientists use innovative, state-of-the-art methods to understand the Earth. Our science is used by Federal, Tribal, State, and local agencies to solve increasingly complex problems facing resource managers. This site explores real-life examples of USGS science applied to societal challenges

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The USGS is dedicated to studying how Earth processes can affect the structures, systems and facilities that are needed for the Nation and its economy to function.

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The USGS provides unbiased information on energy and mineral potential, production, and consumption, as well as related environmental effects.

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This site explores real-life examples of USGS science applied to societal challenges.

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News

Date published: February 2, 2017

Earthquake Early Warning: Vital for City Transit

Although no one can reliably predict earthquakes, today’s technology is advanced enough to rapidly detect seismic waves as an earthquake begins, calculate the maximum expected shaking, and send alerts to surrounding areas before damage can occur. This technology is known as “earthquake early warning” (EEW).

Date published: February 2, 2017

Forecasting the World’s Energy Resources

It is difficult to overstate the importance of energy to the American economy.  Managing this vital sector depends on knowing how many energy resources we have, how many we use and need, and how these resources are transported.

Date published: February 1, 2017

The Vital Nature of Streamgaging

Gary Moore spent the last three days of 2015 stacking hefty bags of sand in front of a fellow church member’s brick home. With only 1,000 feet between the house and the swelling Mississippi and Meramec Rivers, Moore and other volunteers worked quickly, in frigid temperatures, to assemble a 10-foot high, 1,000-foot-long sandbag wall to ward off floodwaters.

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