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Algorithms and Methods

 

 

Filter Total Items: 4

Shoreline Definition in Emergent Wetland Environments

Coastal shoreline mapping is a particularly complex issue because of the dynamic nature of water levels at the land-water interface, the various tidal vertical datums in use, and the spatial scale of the shoreline delineation. In addition, the definition of a shoreline varies depending on whether the shoreline will be used for nautical charts and navigation, delineating the legal federal and state...
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Shoreline Definition in Emergent Wetland Environments

Coastal shoreline mapping is a particularly complex issue because of the dynamic nature of water levels at the land-water interface, the various tidal vertical datums in use, and the spatial scale of the shoreline delineation. In addition, the definition of a shoreline varies depending on whether the shoreline will be used for nautical charts and navigation, delineating the legal federal and state...
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Shoreline Definition of Inland Water Bodies Not Hydrologically Connected to the Ocean

Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting lidar point cloud. Thus, the absence of lidar returns over water is useful for identifying inland water bodies that are not connected by any path to...
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Shoreline Definition of Inland Water Bodies Not Hydrologically Connected to the Ocean

Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting lidar point cloud. Thus, the absence of lidar returns over water is useful for identifying inland water bodies that are not connected by any path to...
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Hydrologic-Enforcement of Lidar DEMs

Hydrologic connectivity of light detection and ranging (lidar)-derived elevation data is critical for coastal hydrologic modeling applications. However, unless hydrologically-enforced, raised structures (i.e. bridges, roads overlaying culverts) can block overland flow to coastal waters. Because highly detailed lidar-derived elevation surfaces include features such as bridge decks and road fill...
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Hydrologic-Enforcement of Lidar DEMs

Hydrologic connectivity of light detection and ranging (lidar)-derived elevation data is critical for coastal hydrologic modeling applications. However, unless hydrologically-enforced, raised structures (i.e. bridges, roads overlaying culverts) can block overland flow to coastal waters. Because highly detailed lidar-derived elevation surfaces include features such as bridge decks and road fill...
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Mapping Fluvial Ecosystems

Light detection and ranging (lidar) wave-form processing capabilities are being developed to utilize the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program Experimental Advanced Airborne Research (EAARL) sensor. The EAARL lidar point cloud collection consists of highly detailed submerged and shallow bathymetry (water depth) of river channels, which will be merged with land elevation...
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Mapping Fluvial Ecosystems

Light detection and ranging (lidar) wave-form processing capabilities are being developed to utilize the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program Experimental Advanced Airborne Research (EAARL) sensor. The EAARL lidar point cloud collection consists of highly detailed submerged and shallow bathymetry (water depth) of river channels, which will be merged with land elevation...
Learn More