Paul Grams, Ph.D.

I am a geomorphologist and mangage a set of projects collectively called the River Geomorphology and Geomorphic Change project at the US Geological Survey Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center. These include a range of studies that describe, quantify, and predict geomorphic change, mostly on large rivers in the western United States. 

Biography

Paul Grams received a BA in Geology from Middlebury College (1991), an M.S. in Geology from Utah State University (1997), and a Ph.D. in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University (2006). For an undergraduate thesis, Paul examined the effects of Hells Canyon Dam on the hydrology and downstream physical resources of the Snake River in Idaho. Since that time he has studied the interaction between human-induced changes in hydrology and channel form on many segments of the Green River in Utah and Colorado, small streams in northern Utah and southern Idaho, and the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Paul’s current research interests are in fluvial geomorphology, sediment transport, the downstream effects of dams and diversions, and the connections between physical processes and ecological systems on large rivers. Paul is currently a research hydrologist at the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center and manages several projects related to geomorphology, sediment budgets, and the effects of controlled floods on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon and in other parts of the Colorado River Basin.

Geomorphology at Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

Sandbar monitoring web application

Profile on Google Scholar