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Arizona Water Science Center

Welcome to the U.S. Geological Survey Arizona Water Science Center.  Our mission is to collect and interpret high quality, impartial scientific information to provide resource managers and the public with the knowledge required to understand and manage the critical water resources of Arizona and the Southwest.

News

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Arizona USGS Social Media

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Uranium in Grand Canyon Region Groundwater Mostly Complies with Federal Health Standards

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A Century of Watching the Colorado River

Publications

Gravity surveys for estimating possible width of enhanced porosity zones across structures on the Coconino Plateau, Coconino County, north-central Arizona

The U.S. Geological Survey completed gravity transects in 2015, 2018, and 2019 over four features: the Bright Angel Fault, Bright Angel Monocline, Tusayan Graben, and Redlands Ranch Fault Zone in the Coconino Plateau, Coconino County, Arizona, to determine if the existence and width of high porosity (low density) zones could be inferred from the resulting gravity contrasts, which could be used to

The applicability of time-integrated unit stream power for estimating bridge pier scour using noncontact methods in a gravel-bed river

In near-field remote sensing, noncontact methods (radars) that measure stage and surface water velocity have the potential to supplement traditional bridge scour monitoring tools because they are safer to access and are less likely to be damaged compared with in-stream sensors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of radars for monitoring the hydraulic conditions that contribute to

Conceptual models of groundwater flow in the Grand Canyon region, Arizona

The conceptual models of groundwater flow outlined herein synthesize what is known and hypothesized about the groundwater-flow systems that discharge to the Grand Canyon of Arizona. These models interpret the hydrogeologic characteristics and hydrologic dynamics of the physical systems into a framework for understanding key aspects of the physical systems as they relate to groundwater flow and con

Science

Sediment Transport in the Colorado River and All-American Canal system at Imperial Dam

Like many other dams, Imperial Dam impounds much of the suspended sediment moving in the Colorado River but some of that suspended sediment makes its way to the All-American Canal, a major diversion for irrigation and municipal water. Water entering the All-American Canal is settled in several desilting basins to remove most of the remaining suspended sediment. The collected sediment from the...
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Sediment Transport in the Colorado River and All-American Canal system at Imperial Dam

Like many other dams, Imperial Dam impounds much of the suspended sediment moving in the Colorado River but some of that suspended sediment makes its way to the All-American Canal, a major diversion for irrigation and municipal water. Water entering the All-American Canal is settled in several desilting basins to remove most of the remaining suspended sediment. The collected sediment from the...
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Forecasting Total Dissolved Solids Concentrations of Groundwater from the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project

The USGS seeks to increase understanding of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project well field and to estimate future groundwater levels and total dissolved solids concentrations in the wells and the long-term viability of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project.
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Forecasting Total Dissolved Solids Concentrations of Groundwater from the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project

The USGS seeks to increase understanding of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project well field and to estimate future groundwater levels and total dissolved solids concentrations in the wells and the long-term viability of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project.
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Aquifer-storage monitoring at Tucson Water’s Heritage Project

Tucson Water’s Santa Cruz River Heritage Project releases up to 3,150 acre-feet a year of reclaimed water into the Santa Cruz River channel near downtown Tucson, AZ, much of which is expected to recharge to the subsurface through the channel bottom. Tracking the movement of recharged water is necessary to limit the dispersal of that water within specific target boundaries, and to enable resource...
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Aquifer-storage monitoring at Tucson Water’s Heritage Project

Tucson Water’s Santa Cruz River Heritage Project releases up to 3,150 acre-feet a year of reclaimed water into the Santa Cruz River channel near downtown Tucson, AZ, much of which is expected to recharge to the subsurface through the channel bottom. Tracking the movement of recharged water is necessary to limit the dispersal of that water within specific target boundaries, and to enable resource...
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