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Drinking-Water

The USGS California Water Science Center works with drinking water facilities and municipal suppliers to monitor and assess the quality of the water used as a source for our state's drinking water needs. Ongoing research is addressing concerns over groundwater supply, water quality of wells, agricultural and industrial by-products in drinking water, toxins from harmful algal blooms, effects from wildfires, floods, and debris flow, and other issues affecting California's drinking water supply. 

Filter Total Items: 20

Forecasting Total Dissolved Solids Concentrations of Groundwater from the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project

The USGS seeks to increase understanding of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project well field and to estimate future groundwater levels and total dissolved solids concentrations in the wells and the long-term viability of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project.
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Forecasting Total Dissolved Solids Concentrations of Groundwater from the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project

The USGS seeks to increase understanding of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project well field and to estimate future groundwater levels and total dissolved solids concentrations in the wells and the long-term viability of the Lower Colorado Water Supply Project.
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Evaluation of Hydrodynamic Mixing in Keswick Reservoir, California

Keswick Reservoir, on the Sacramento River, receives both water and contaminants from the Spring Creek Debris Dam. The term contaminants refers here to different kinds of chemicals that are in some instances delivered to lakes and rivers. These chemicals can have a detrimental effect on drinking water supplies and the health of humans, fish, and other aquatic species.
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Evaluation of Hydrodynamic Mixing in Keswick Reservoir, California

Keswick Reservoir, on the Sacramento River, receives both water and contaminants from the Spring Creek Debris Dam. The term contaminants refers here to different kinds of chemicals that are in some instances delivered to lakes and rivers. These chemicals can have a detrimental effect on drinking water supplies and the health of humans, fish, and other aquatic species.
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Sediment transport, streamflow, and climate change: long-term resilience of the Bay-Delta

Sediment supply is important to the health of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay (Bay-Delta) ecosystem. Sediment eroded from upland source areas in the Sacramento and San Joaquin watersheds is transported through the rivers to the Bay-Delta where it is deposited in mudflats and tidal wetlands, which in turn helps protect against the effects of sea-level rise. Sediment...
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Sediment transport, streamflow, and climate change: long-term resilience of the Bay-Delta

Sediment supply is important to the health of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay (Bay-Delta) ecosystem. Sediment eroded from upland source areas in the Sacramento and San Joaquin watersheds is transported through the rivers to the Bay-Delta where it is deposited in mudflats and tidal wetlands, which in turn helps protect against the effects of sea-level rise. Sediment...
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Characterizing the Influence of Fire on Hydrology in Southern California

The frequency of fire in southern California forests has steadily increased over time as a result of ignitions at the growing wildland-urban interface, as well as a result of warming due to climate change. Understanding the implications of increased wildfire on hydrologic conditions and water supply is particularly important given the increasing demands for water resources to satisfy growing...
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Characterizing the Influence of Fire on Hydrology in Southern California

The frequency of fire in southern California forests has steadily increased over time as a result of ignitions at the growing wildland-urban interface, as well as a result of warming due to climate change. Understanding the implications of increased wildfire on hydrologic conditions and water supply is particularly important given the increasing demands for water resources to satisfy growing...
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Developing Spatial Data on Mineral Deposits Found on Abandoned Mine Lands

Better understanding of mineral deposits and their impact on the environment, including the water system, is necessary for the protection of public health. The USGS is working with other federal and state agencies to identify the environmental behavior of these deposits and their waste products. USGS scientists are using geospatial data (data that can be mapped) to prioritize abandoned mine land...
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Developing Spatial Data on Mineral Deposits Found on Abandoned Mine Lands

Better understanding of mineral deposits and their impact on the environment, including the water system, is necessary for the protection of public health. The USGS is working with other federal and state agencies to identify the environmental behavior of these deposits and their waste products. USGS scientists are using geospatial data (data that can be mapped) to prioritize abandoned mine land...
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San Diego Hydrogeology

This is the first comprehensive geologic and hydrologic study for the San Diego area. This study will provide the integrated hydrogeologic knowledge necessary in this important and highly visible area of the United States and will serve as a role model for similar coastal settings throughout the world that have modest rainfall and small aquifers. Locally, results will help state and federal...
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San Diego Hydrogeology

This is the first comprehensive geologic and hydrologic study for the San Diego area. This study will provide the integrated hydrogeologic knowledge necessary in this important and highly visible area of the United States and will serve as a role model for similar coastal settings throughout the world that have modest rainfall and small aquifers. Locally, results will help state and federal...
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Groundwater Ambient Monitoring & Assessment (GAMA)

The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program’s Priority Basin Project (GAMA-PBP) was established by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 (Sections 10780-10782.3 of the California Water Code). The USGS is the technical lead for the GAMA-PBP and between 2004-2012 focused on characterizing the quality of...
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Groundwater Ambient Monitoring & Assessment (GAMA)

The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program’s Priority Basin Project (GAMA-PBP) was established by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 (Sections 10780-10782.3 of the California Water Code). The USGS is the technical lead for the GAMA-PBP and between 2004-2012 focused on characterizing the quality of...
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Occurrence of natural and anthropogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, CA

Between 1952 and 1964, cooling water was treated with a compound containing chromium to prevent corrosion within the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Hinkley Compressor Station. This water was discharged to unlined ponds, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater within the underlying alluvial aquifer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of natural and...
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Occurrence of natural and anthropogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, CA

Between 1952 and 1964, cooling water was treated with a compound containing chromium to prevent corrosion within the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Hinkley Compressor Station. This water was discharged to unlined ponds, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater within the underlying alluvial aquifer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of natural and...
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Borrego Valley Groundwater Conditions

Groundwater is effectively the sole source of water supply for Borrego Valley, California. By the mid-2000s, agriculture, recreation (predominantly golf courses), municipal uses, and the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park required about four times more water than is available through natural recharge. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative study of the Borrego Valley with the...
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Borrego Valley Groundwater Conditions

Groundwater is effectively the sole source of water supply for Borrego Valley, California. By the mid-2000s, agriculture, recreation (predominantly golf courses), municipal uses, and the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park required about four times more water than is available through natural recharge. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative study of the Borrego Valley with the...
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Water-Level, Water-Quality and Land-Subsidence Studies in the Mojave River and Morongo Groundwater Basins

Groundwater has been the primary source of domestic, agricultural, and municipal water supplies in the southwestern Mojave Desert, California, since the early 1900s. The population of the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins has grown rapidly during the last several decades, increasing from an estimated population of almost 273,000 in 1990 (Mojave Water Agency, 2004) to more than 453,000 in...
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Water-Level, Water-Quality and Land-Subsidence Studies in the Mojave River and Morongo Groundwater Basins

Groundwater has been the primary source of domestic, agricultural, and municipal water supplies in the southwestern Mojave Desert, California, since the early 1900s. The population of the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins has grown rapidly during the last several decades, increasing from an estimated population of almost 273,000 in 1990 (Mojave Water Agency, 2004) to more than 453,000 in...
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Exploring: Reservoir Capacity And Sedimentation Of The Fena Valley Reservoir Guam

The Fena Valley Reservoir, located in southern Guam, is the primary source of water for the United States Naval Base Guam and nearby village residents. At full capacity, the reservoir surface area extends approximately 0.30 mi2, and drains a watershed area of about 5.88 mi2. After reservoir construction, periodic bathymetric surveys, coupled with sedimentation models, can be used to produce...
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Exploring: Reservoir Capacity And Sedimentation Of The Fena Valley Reservoir Guam

The Fena Valley Reservoir, located in southern Guam, is the primary source of water for the United States Naval Base Guam and nearby village residents. At full capacity, the reservoir surface area extends approximately 0.30 mi2, and drains a watershed area of about 5.88 mi2. After reservoir construction, periodic bathymetric surveys, coupled with sedimentation models, can be used to produce...
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Trends in Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

Water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta contains high concentrations of disinfection byproduct-forming (DBP-forming) materials when treated for potable use. DBPs form when dissolved organic compounds (DOC) in water react with disinfectants such as chlorine and ozone during the water treatment process. The amount of DBPs that form is a function of both the amount and source of the DOC, both of...
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Trends in Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

Water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta contains high concentrations of disinfection byproduct-forming (DBP-forming) materials when treated for potable use. DBPs form when dissolved organic compounds (DOC) in water react with disinfectants such as chlorine and ozone during the water treatment process. The amount of DBPs that form is a function of both the amount and source of the DOC, both of...
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