Columbia Environmental Research Center

Conservation, Quantitative, and Restoration Ecology

Conservation Ecology scientists support resource management agencies through lab and field studies that evaluate contamination, behavior, invasive species, fire, the persistence and fate of land management chemicals, and the causality of species and/or population declines with an emphasis on threatened or endangered species.    

Restoration Ecology scientists develop methods for evaluating the success of ecological restoration with an emphasis on monitoring ecosystem structure and function.  Much of the effort is in support of the DOI's Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Program and directed toward restoration in contaminated habitats.  The methods developed are intended to help resource managers ensure restoration activities lead to the recovery of ecosystem services.

Qualitative Ecology scientists conduct risk assessments to understand the potential spread of invasive species, and habitat characteristics that may influence their distribution.  They also conduct population and energetic modeling to understand habitat requirements of species at risk such as the pallid sturgeon. 

David Walters, Ph.D., Branch Chief

Filter Total Items: 9
Date published: October 2, 2019
Status: Active

Comparative Freshwater Fish Toxicity Testing of Antimycin A

Researchers are investigating the influence of Antimycin A on Asian carp and non-target fishes by measuring the effects of a novel species-specific bait formulation.

Contacts: Jill Jenkins, Ph.D., Robin D Calfee, Bonnie Brown
Date published: September 14, 2018
Status: Active

Development and Evaluation of Novel Capture Gears for Bigheaded Carps

Mass removal of Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, hereafter referred to as bigheaded carps, is a primary management action to contain the population growth and reduce upstream dispersal. The use of passive trap nets to harvest bigheaded carps may effectively supplement active capture techniques. The USGS is working with...

Date published: September 14, 2018
Status: Active

Use and Evaluation of Stimuli for Herding Bigheaded Carps to Increase their Capture Efficiency

Mass removal of silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, hereafter referred to as bigheaded carps, is a primary management action to contain the population growth and reduce upstream dispersal. Given their evasive behavior and gear avoidance, catching bigheaded carps efficiently has been difficult. Techniques that can allow managers...

Date published: September 13, 2018
Status: Active

Chemical Attractant Investigations to Increase Aggregation and Harvest for the Control of Asian Carp

Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, hereafter referred to as bigheaded carps, are rapidly expanding their range. Federal agencies and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources are focused on keeping invasive carps out of the Great Lakes. The development of an effective attractant may assist managers with capturing carps in...

Contacts: Robin D Calfee, Katelyn Lawson, Patrick Mills
Date published: September 12, 2018
Status: Active

Assessment of Acoustic Stimuli for Manipulating Movement of Bigheaded Carps

Invasive Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, hereafter referred to as bigheaded carps, have displayed a negative phonotactic response when presented with a broadband acoustic stimulus. Additional study is needed to identify effective acoustic stimuli for manipulating bigheaded carp behavior, and to test bigheaded carp responses to those stimuli...

Date published: June 21, 2018
Status: Active

High Resolution Vegetation Mapping at Palmyra Atoll Using Unoccupied Aerial Systems (UAS)-Acquired Imagery

Lying 1000 miles south of Hawaii, Palmyra Atoll is a marine wilderness co-managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and The Nature Conservancy. Beach forests of Pisonia grandis and other vegetation communities provide habitat for thousands of nesting terns, boobies, and other birds. Introduced coconut (Cocos nucifera) groves and use of Palmyra as a World War II airfield left a legacy of...

Date published: June 21, 2018
Status: Active

UAS and Other Remote Sensing and Imagery Analysis For Disaster Response, Remediation, and Restoration and Monitoring Ecological Restoration

CERC scientists are utilizing remote sensing technologies to facilitate rapid collection of ephemeral field data following disasters, to assess injuries to natural resources and potential threats to human health, and to inform and monitor ecological restoration.

Date published: June 8, 2018
Status: Active

Restoration Planning, Implementation, and Monitoring: Invasive Species Eradication and Control Program at the Little Saint Francis River Chat Pile

Among sites undergoing restoration activities as part of the Southeast Missouri Mining District (SEMO) Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration settlement, the Little St. Francis River Chat Pile (LSFR) will be one the first in Madison County at which primary ecological restoration will be implemented. CERC scientists are collaborating with the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the...

Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Fire and Climate Suitability for Woody Vegetation Communities in the South Central United States

Climate and fire are global drivers of plant species distributions in the south central United States. Long-term management of vegetation communities can benefit from information on projected spatial changes in climate and fire frequencies.

Contacts: Esther D Stroh, Ph.D., Matthew Struckhoff, Michael C. Stambaugh, Ph.D.