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Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center

Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center (GECSC) researchers conduct multi-purpose geologic mapping and topical scientific studies to address issues concerning geologic, climatic, ecosystem, and land surface changes; human interactions with the environment; and physical, chemical, and biological characterization of the Earth's surface and upper crust. 

News

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Fossilized Footprints Reveal Human Habitation of North America Thousands of Years Earlier than Previously Thought

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Low-Flying Airplane Mapping Parts of Northeastern California

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Learning From Real-World Experience to Understand Renewable Energy Impacts to Wildlife

Publications

Oxygen isotopes of land snail shells in high latitude regions

The present study investigates the environmental significance of the oxygen isotopic composition of several modern land snail species collected along two north-to-south transects in Alaska and Scandinavia at latitudes between 60 and 70 °N. We tested the hypothesis that land snail shell δ18O values primarily track precipitation δ18O. The results show that shell δ18O values from Scandinavia were ∼5.

Photomosaics and logs associated with study of West Napa Fault at Ehlers Lane, north of Saint Helena, California

The West Napa Fault has previously been mapped as extending ~45 kilometers (km) from northern Vallejo to southern Saint Helena, California, dominantly running along the western edge of Napa Valley. A zone of fault strands (some previously unmapped) along a ~15-km section of the fault ruptured during the 2014 magnitude 6.0 South Napa earthquake, illustrating the need for further investigation of th

Response to comment on “Evidence of humans in North America during the Last Glacial Maximum”

Madsen et al. question the reliability of calibrated radiocarbon ages associated with human footprints discovered recently in White Sands National Park, New Mexico, USA. On the basis of the geologic, hydrologic, stratigraphic, and chronologic evidence, we maintain that the ages are robust and conclude that the footprints date to between ~23,000 and 21,000 years ago.Madsen et al. (1) question the v