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Idaho Water Science Center

Water is the lifeblood of Idaho. Our mission is to provide our local, state, tribal, and federal partners with reliable, unbiased science information to help them effectively manage the state's water resources.

 

News

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Idaho Hydrologic Update, September 2022

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Idaho Hydrologic Update, July 2022

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Idaho Hydrologic Update, June 2022

Publications

Evaluation of sample preservation methods for analysis of selected volatile organic compounds in groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

During 2020, water samples were collected from 25 wells completed in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and from 1 well completed in perched groundwater above the aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory to determine the effect of different sample-preservation methods on the laboratory determinations of concentrations of volatile organic compounds. Paired-sample sets were collected at each well

In-reservoir physical processes modulate aqueous and biological methylmercury export from a seasonally anoxic reservoir

Anoxic conditions within reservoirs related to thermal stratification and oxygen depletion lead to methylmercury (MeHg) production, a key process governing the uptake of mercury in aquatic food webs. Once formed within a reservoir, the timing and magnitude of the biological uptake of MeHg and the relative importance of MeHg export in water versus biological compartments remain poorly understood. W

Evaluation of select velocity measurement techniques for estimating discharge in small streams across the United States

Multiple instruments and methods exist for collecting discrete streamflow measurements in small streams with low flows, defined here as less than 5.7 m3/s (200 ft3/s). Included in the available methods are low-cost approaches that are infrequently used, in part, because their uncertainty is not well known. In this work, we evaluated the accuracy and suitability of three low-cost velocity measureme

Science

Bathymetric Survey of the Mores Creek Arm of Lucky Peak Lake

In 2004, about 90 migrating elk and 25 mule deer broke through thin ice and drowned as they attempted to cross the Mores Creek arm of Lucky Peak Lake upstream of the Highway 21 bridge. To prevent any similar incidents, reservoir managers and wildlife biologists needed a better understanding of water depths over a range of reservoir pool elevations.
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Bathymetric Survey of the Mores Creek Arm of Lucky Peak Lake

In 2004, about 90 migrating elk and 25 mule deer broke through thin ice and drowned as they attempted to cross the Mores Creek arm of Lucky Peak Lake upstream of the Highway 21 bridge. To prevent any similar incidents, reservoir managers and wildlife biologists needed a better understanding of water depths over a range of reservoir pool elevations.
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American Falls Reservoir Bathymetry

In cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, we surveyed the bathymetry within an area of about 500 acres of American Falls Reservoir between River Miles 713 and 714 August 6-8, 2019. The bathymetric survey provided high-resolution detail of a proposed treatment area for an aeration system that is being developed to support water quality during the American Falls spillway concrete repair project...
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American Falls Reservoir Bathymetry

In cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, we surveyed the bathymetry within an area of about 500 acres of American Falls Reservoir between River Miles 713 and 714 August 6-8, 2019. The bathymetric survey provided high-resolution detail of a proposed treatment area for an aeration system that is being developed to support water quality during the American Falls spillway concrete repair project...
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Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring of Middle Snake River Springs in Support of Threatened and Endangered Snail Species

Two species of aquatic snails, the Banbury Springs limpet (Idaholanx fresti) and the Bliss Rapids snail (Taylorconcha serpenticola) live in springs along the middle Snake River in south-central Idaho. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed these species as Endangered (Banbury Springs limpet) and Threatened (Bliss Rapids snail). Both species need clean, cold spring water to survive.
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Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring of Middle Snake River Springs in Support of Threatened and Endangered Snail Species

Two species of aquatic snails, the Banbury Springs limpet (Idaholanx fresti) and the Bliss Rapids snail (Taylorconcha serpenticola) live in springs along the middle Snake River in south-central Idaho. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed these species as Endangered (Banbury Springs limpet) and Threatened (Bliss Rapids snail). Both species need clean, cold spring water to survive.
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