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Idaho Water Science Center

Water is critical to Idaho's quality of life and economic vitality. We provide reliable, unbiased hydrologic data and scientific studies to help our local, state, tribal, and federal partners effectively manage Idaho's water resources.

News

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Idaho Hydrologic Update, December 2023

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Idaho Hydrologic Update, November 2023

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Idaho Hydrologic Update, October 2023

Publications

Trace metal and phosphorus loading from groundwater seepage into South Fork Coeur d’Alene River after remediation at the Bunker Hill Superfund Site, northern Idaho, 2022

Widely dispersed waste products from historical mining in northern Idaho’s Coeur d’Alene mining district have long been a concern in the Coeur d’Alene River Basin in northern Idaho. The Central Impoundment Area (CIA), an unlined mining waste repository that is part of the Bunker Hill Superfund Site designated in 1983, is adjacent to the South Fork Coeur d’Alene River between Kellogg and Smeltervil
Authors
Erin M. Murray, Lauren M. Zinsser

Mercury sources and budget for the Snake River above a hydroelectric reservoir complex

Understanding sources of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) to a water body is critical for management but is often complicated by poorly characterized Hg inputs and in situ processes, such as inorganic Hg methylation. In this study, we determined inorganic Hg and MeHg concentrations and loads (filter-passing and particulate fractions) for a semi-arid 164-kilometer stretch of the Snake River ab
Authors
Austin K. Baldwin, Sarah E. Janssen, Michael T. Tate, Brett Poulin, Alysa Muir Yoder, Jesse Naymik, Christopher F. Larsen, Charles Hoovestol, David P. Krabbenhoft

Bioavailability and toxicity models of copper to freshwater life: The state of regulatory science

Efforts to incorporate bioavailability adjustments into regulatory water quality criteria in the United States have included four major procedures: hardness-based single-linear regression equations, water-effect ratios (WERs), biotic ligand models (BLMs), and multiple-linear regression models (MLRs) that use dissolved organic carbon, hardness, and pH. The performance of each with copper (Cu) is ev
Authors
Christopher A. Mebane

Science

Publications - Idaho National Laboratory

Since the USGS established a project office at the Idaho National Laboratory in 1949, we have published the findings of our scientific monitoring and research. Many of these publications are available through the USGS Publications Warehouse. A complete bibliography of our publications is available at the link below.
link

Publications - Idaho National Laboratory

Since the USGS established a project office at the Idaho National Laboratory in 1949, we have published the findings of our scientific monitoring and research. Many of these publications are available through the USGS Publications Warehouse. A complete bibliography of our publications is available at the link below.
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Estimating Spring Discharge to the Snake River, Milner Dam to King Hill, Southern Idaho

Groundwater discharges to the Snake River from numerous volcanic rock springs along the northern canyon wall between Milner Dam and King Hill. Water-resource managers need to be able to quantify the amount of this water to understand the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer's recharge, storage, and discharge. When completed, this study will provide the Idaho Department of Water Resources with an...
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Estimating Spring Discharge to the Snake River, Milner Dam to King Hill, Southern Idaho

Groundwater discharges to the Snake River from numerous volcanic rock springs along the northern canyon wall between Milner Dam and King Hill. Water-resource managers need to be able to quantify the amount of this water to understand the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer's recharge, storage, and discharge. When completed, this study will provide the Idaho Department of Water Resources with an...
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Bathymetric Survey of the Mores Creek Arm of Lucky Peak Lake

In 2004, about 90 migrating elk and 25 mule deer broke through thin ice and drowned as they attempted to cross the Mores Creek arm of Lucky Peak Lake upstream of the Highway 21 bridge. To prevent any similar incidents, reservoir managers and wildlife biologists needed a better understanding of water depths over a range of reservoir pool elevations.
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Bathymetric Survey of the Mores Creek Arm of Lucky Peak Lake

In 2004, about 90 migrating elk and 25 mule deer broke through thin ice and drowned as they attempted to cross the Mores Creek arm of Lucky Peak Lake upstream of the Highway 21 bridge. To prevent any similar incidents, reservoir managers and wildlife biologists needed a better understanding of water depths over a range of reservoir pool elevations.
Learn More