Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

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October 22, 2020

100 Years of Service to Migratory Bird Conservation in North America

This year, the USGS is celebrating the 100-year anniversary of their Bird Banding Laboratory and a century of advancing avian conservation science. Banding is one of the oldest and most important techniques used for studying individual birds. John Tautin, former Chief of the Bird Banding Lab and co-author of Bird Banding in North America: The First Hundred Years, will join

Photo Contest Winner | March 2020 | Where We Work
March 18, 2020

Photo Contest Winner | March 2020 | Where We Work

Red-crowned cranes at USGS Wildlife Toxicology site visit to Kushiro Marsh, Japan

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December 17, 2019

Calliopsis edwardsii, f, left, Mariposa CA

The female of the already portrayed male Calliopsis edwardsii from Yosemite National Park and collected for a project done by Lauren Ponisio examining the effect of fire diversity on bees (Ponisio et al. Global Change Biol. 2016). Photograph by Anders Croft. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin

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December 17, 2019

Lasioglossum georgeckworti, F, Face, NY, Queens

A dune specialist. You won't find this species anywhere except in the dunes immediately along the ocean. As such it is a poster child for vulnerability to coastal sea level change and global climate change. Where will all the many species of plants, insects, and animals go that only exists on dunelands if the dunes cannot reform to the interior as the ocean's rise?

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December 17, 2019

Andrena barbilabris, U, Face, PG county, MD

A female collected by Tracy Zarillo from the New Haven area

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December 17, 2019

Heriades leavitti, m, face, Dorchester Co, MD

A tiny be, this one found in the flat marshy landscape of Dorchester County, Maryland. There is a pair of the species Heriades leavitti and Heriades variolosa both appear to be essentially impossible to tell apart in the female form, but in the mail form there very clear differences underneath the abdomen. Sadly, this is often difficult to see without some extra work

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December 17, 2019

Coelioxys obtusiventris, f, back, Clark Co., Rose Pond, CA

Super rare. Only a few individuals of this species have been found, but, interestingly, this species has been found twice in Missouri, and once in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Florida. This one was sent to me by Mike Arduser and collected in Clark County, Missouri. Note the lovely flair of hairs around the end of the abdomen....very distinctive. Photography

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December 17, 2019

Dufourea monardae, F, Side, WI, Eau Claire County

One of about 3 Monarda specialist in Eastern North America. This uncommon bee was collected in Wisconsin, likely by Denny Johnson and photographed by Amber Reese. A northern species and not one we have had any experience collecting or observing. That said, it could occur in Maryland if people spend more time collecting off of Bee Balm. Photography Information: Canon

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December 17, 2019

Osmia versicolor, F, Side, Greece, Aegean Islands, Lesvos, Mytilene

Perhaps one of the most colorful Osmia, Osmia versicolor, collected by Jelle Devalez on the Aegean Islands of Greece. Yet another snail shell nester. What would these species do if there were no snail shells and no snails to make them? Photography by Maggie Yuan. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens

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December 17, 2019

Megachile brevis, F, side, Tennessee, Haywood County

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee - A leaf cutting bee, common throughout much of North America

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December 17, 2019

Andrena-perplexa,------,side

Andrena perplexa, female, May 2012, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

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December 17, 2019

Varroa destructor4

Varroa destructor, the leading cause of beekeeper angst. This relatively large mite parasitizes honeybees from adults to larvae. Crab-like aren't they? Specimen provided by Krisztina Christmon from the University of Maryland where she studies the life history of these tricky beings. Oh, that is the tip of an insect pin you see in the picture. Photography Information

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