Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

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Herding Pelicans - August 2019 NER Photo Winner
August 20, 2019

Herding Pelicans 2019 NER photo winner

Melissa Roach, biologist with the Patuxent Bird Banding Lab, keeps pelican chicks that are waiting for banding from sneaking away into the marsh on Smith Island in Chesapeake Bay.  August 2019 NER USGS at Work Photo winner.

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November 5, 2018

Lasioglossum coeruleum,f, head, ct, powerlines_45073858764

Aptly named: Lasioglossum coeruleum. Most of the many confusing members of these small sweat bees glimmer discretely in metallic integument, but our friend here takes it up a notch to and Osmia level. This makes them identifiable...except for the problem that some of them are not so bright...irritating if you have to identify them...but once you get the pattern you feel

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November 5, 2018

Lasioglossum coeruleum, f, back, ct, powerlines_45073864704

Aptly named: Lasioglossum coeruleum. Most of the many confusing members of these small sweat bees glimmer discretely in metallic integument, but our friend here takes it up a notch to and Osmia level. This makes them identifiable...except for the problem that some of them are not so bright...irritating if you have to identify them...but once you get the pattern you feel

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November 5, 2018

Lasioglossum coeruleum, f, side, ct, powerlines_43981493570

Aptly named: Lasioglossum coeruleum. Most of the many confusing members of these small sweat bees glimmer discretely in metallic integument, but our friend here takes it up a notch to and Osmia level. This makes them identifiable...except for the problem that some of them are not so bright...irritating if you have to identify them...but once you get the pattern you feel

...
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November 5, 2018

Lasioglossum vierecki, f, head, ma, powerlines_45128669174

Sand. The Golden Sand Loving Bee. When I think of bees that are sand loving I think of Lasioglossum vierecki. For one, how nice to have a golden orange bee to look at. For second it is common in sandy areas...so if you are going to find a sand specialist in a sand mine, dune, beach, barren, sandhill in the Northeast there you will find this little orange bee. Thirdly

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November 5, 2018

Osmia georgica, f, side, michael veit, powerlines_45755530202

Osmia georgica. Nests in holes. Hangs out on mid summer composites. Has orange pollen carrying hairs. Has boss knobs on the upper side of the mandibles (why?). This specimen found on Dave Wagner transmission line study in New England by Michael Veit. All good. ~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~All photographs are public domain, feel free to download

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November 5, 2018

Osmia georgica, f, back, ma, powerline_45755533292

Osmia georgica. Nests in holes. Hangs out on mid summer composites. Has orange pollen carrying hairs. Has boss knobs on the upper side of the mandibles (why?). This specimen found on Dave Wagner transmission line study in New England by Michael Veit. All good. ~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~All photographs are public domain, feel free to download

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November 5, 2018

Osmia georgica, f, head, michael veit, powerlines_45804841211

Osmia georgica. Nests in holes. Hangs out on mid summer composites. Has orange pollen carrying hairs. Has boss knobs on the upper side of the mandibles (why?). This specimen found on Dave Wagner transmission line study in New England by Michael Veit. All good. ~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~All photographs are public domain, feel free to download

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November 5, 2018

Lasioglossum vierecki, f, side, ma, powerlines_45853317931

Sand. The Golden Sand Loving Bee. When I think of bees that are sand loving I think of Lasioglossum vierecki. For one, how nice to have a golden orange bee to look at. For second it is common in sandy areas...so if you are going to find a sand specialist in a sand mine, dune, beach, barren, sandhill in the Northeast there you will find this little orange bee. Thirdly

...
close up image
November 5, 2018

Lasioglossum vierecki, f, back, ma, powerlines_45853319331

Sand. The Golden Sand Loving Bee. When I think of bees that are sand loving I think of Lasioglossum vierecki. For one, how nice to have a golden orange bee to look at. For second it is common in sandy areas...so if you are going to find a sand specialist in a sand mine, dune, beach, barren, sandhill in the Northeast there you will find this little orange bee. Thirdly

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November 2, 2018

Macropis nuda, head, m, ma, veit powerline_44981134194

Another Macropis from transmission lines from NH and MA. This species (M. nuda) is also a Lysimachia specialist and the female bright white pollen carrying hairs and likely the hairs under the abdomen soak up oils which are used by the female to add to pollen to create the food for their young. Collected by Michael Veit and part of a study run by David Wagner

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November 2, 2018

Epeoloides pilosulus, m, back, nh, powerline_30961534907

The poster child for rare bees of concern in North America. This is Epeoloides pilosula, collected on David Wagner study of the conservation landscape of transmission lines. This is a nest parasite of Macropis oil bees. In this study they found both M. nuda and M. ciliata uncommon bees in themselves. And, as a bonus the collected this one Epeoloides in New Hampshire

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