Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Multimedia

Filter Total Items: 4,565
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Diphaglossa gayi, f, side, chile

A large to huge, long-faced bee from Chile. The only member of its genus and strongly associated with the residual and now relictual beech forests of this country. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200 USGSBIML Photoshopping

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Lasioglossum gotham, F, Side, MD, Cecil County

Of the many types of shiny little sweat bees, this is a large one, not that anyone would notice. Named after the Gotham of Gotham City this species occurs sparingly often in woodlands in the East. I particularly like the layout of this shot, the two pairs of wings are nicely symmetrical and the eye glints in just the way you want an eye to glint.

close up of image
December 17, 2019

Cephalanthus occidentalis, Buttonbush, Howard County, Md, Helen Lowe Metzman

Buttonbush, Cephalanthus occidentalis. Likes its feet wet, bumper crops of bees (particularly Hylaeus) and butterflies. No specialists in the bee arena, but adds pollen and nectar in wetlands. Photo and specimen by Helen Lowe Metzman. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Murgantia histrionica, 1, F, back, Maryland, Beltsville

Adult female, Harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica, a common pest of brassicas, these were raised by the Weber USDA lab at Beltsville, Maryland

close up of image
December 17, 2019

Osmia rufohirta, M, Side, Greece, Aegean Islands, Lesvos, Mytilene

Osmia rufohirta - An Osmia from the Grecian Isles that nests in snail shells. Not this specimen as it is a male and does essentially nothing but mate. Lots of reddish hairs on this species as the name implies. Specimen collected by Jelle Devalez. Pictures by Brooke Alexander Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Anthophora bomboides, m, back, Centre Co., PA

Anthophora bomboides, a rather cosmopolitan Anthophora. Found throughout the north and down the mountain chains on both sides of the continent. I have my suspicions that western and eastern populations are possibly different species, but so far no one has talked to the bees' dna about that. As per the name, a very bumble bee looking species, perhaps engendering a bit

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Acanthopus excellens, f, back, brasil

Monster cleptoparasite, this dramatic species is a nest parasite of bees in the genus Centris and is endemic to South America. Note the one shot of the lovely expanded tibial spurs. I do not know their function, but it may have to do with nest invasions, either digging or gripping the walls of the nest. Lovely metallic blue / purple colors. Note the frayed wings, this

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

silver maple, samara whole, md, pg county

Acer saccharinum, the winged Samara, how interesting the similarities between the wing or the samara and the wing of an insect. Collected from my yard in Upper Marlboro, Maryland from a tree that ultimately will fall on my house. Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100,

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Unknown fly, Davidsonville, md, 5x

An unknown, very small fly, note the size of the insect pin point in the picture. They head shot was taken at 10 X and the full body shot was taken at 5X. This fly was collected by Brad Seay in Davidsonville Maryland andt was associated with unknown fly was swarming on deliquescing Stropharia rugosoannulata mushrooms he collected. I played around with creating a North

...
close up of image
December 17, 2019

Bombus fraternus, m, face, Charleston Co., SC

Check the eyes out on this male Bumble Bee. We already put up a spread of female B. fraternus, but the male has some pretty unique features for bumble bees. For one, the eyes are HUGE, they nearly meet at the top of the head. Only a few other bumbles do that...and the face is extremely short, with the mandibles almost joined to the bottom of the eyes. So, the general

...