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River Ecosystem Science

The scientists of the River Ecosystem Science (RES) Branch study the Colorado River within Grand Canyon as part of the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC), a research group within the RES.  As RES scientists, they also study other parts of the Colorado River, and other rivers in the Southwest, other parts of the country, and other parts of the world.  

Filter Total Items: 9

Bug Flows: Improving Food Web Health by Giving Bugs the Weekends Off

Native and desired nonnative fish downstream of Glen Canyon Dam are food limited—meaning that if more or larger invertebrate food items were available, there would be more and larger fish. Aquatic insects have complex life cycles that include egg, larvae, and pupal stages that are aquatic while adults have wings and are typically terrestrial. Aquatic insects are a fundamental component of river...
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Bug Flows: Improving Food Web Health by Giving Bugs the Weekends Off

Native and desired nonnative fish downstream of Glen Canyon Dam are food limited—meaning that if more or larger invertebrate food items were available, there would be more and larger fish. Aquatic insects have complex life cycles that include egg, larvae, and pupal stages that are aquatic while adults have wings and are typically terrestrial. Aquatic insects are a fundamental component of river...
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Airborne Remote Sensing in Grand Canyon

A high-resolution image collection in 2021 will be the most recent in a rich archive of aerial imagery that is used to track changes of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Imagery will be acquired from an airplane in Grand Canyon National Park along the Colorado River corridor and the Little Colorado River starting Memorial Day weekend and continuing through the first week of June 2021. This...
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Airborne Remote Sensing in Grand Canyon

A high-resolution image collection in 2021 will be the most recent in a rich archive of aerial imagery that is used to track changes of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Imagery will be acquired from an airplane in Grand Canyon National Park along the Colorado River corridor and the Little Colorado River starting Memorial Day weekend and continuing through the first week of June 2021. This...
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Is timing really everything? Evaluating Resource Response to Spring Disturbance Flows

Glen Canyon Dam has altered ecological processes of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Before the dam was built, the Colorado River experienced seasonable variable flow rates, including springtime flooding events. These spring floods scoured the river bottom and enhanced natural processes that sustained the Colorado River ecosystem. Since the dam’s construction in 1963, springtime floods have...
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Is timing really everything? Evaluating Resource Response to Spring Disturbance Flows

Glen Canyon Dam has altered ecological processes of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Before the dam was built, the Colorado River experienced seasonable variable flow rates, including springtime flooding events. These spring floods scoured the river bottom and enhanced natural processes that sustained the Colorado River ecosystem. Since the dam’s construction in 1963, springtime floods have...
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River Sediment Dynamics

Sediment controls the physical habitat of river ecosystems. Changes in the amount and areal distribution of different sediment types cause changes in river-channel form and river habitat. The amount and type of sediment suspended in the water column determines water clarity. Understanding sediment transport and the conditions under which sediment is deposited or eroded from the various...
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River Sediment Dynamics

Sediment controls the physical habitat of river ecosystems. Changes in the amount and areal distribution of different sediment types cause changes in river-channel form and river habitat. The amount and type of sediment suspended in the water column determines water clarity. Understanding sediment transport and the conditions under which sediment is deposited or eroded from the various...
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GCMRC Data Releases

Data releases made available by GCMRC can be found here as they are published via the USGS Fundamental Science Practices (FSPs). Individual science product links will take users to the USGS ScienceBase website for each entry. Click on Tools Tab to see list of Data Releases.
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GCMRC Data Releases

Data releases made available by GCMRC can be found here as they are published via the USGS Fundamental Science Practices (FSPs). Individual science product links will take users to the USGS ScienceBase website for each entry. Click on Tools Tab to see list of Data Releases.
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Invertebrate Drift Downstream of Colorado River Basin Dams

Aquatic invertebrates are critical food for fish and other species that inhabit large rivers. In the Colorado River Basin, invertebrates that get transported down the river (“in the drift”) are particularly important to rainbow trout and other species of interest to recreational users. This research seeks to compare rivers downstream of large dams throughout the Colorado River Basin in order to...
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Invertebrate Drift Downstream of Colorado River Basin Dams

Aquatic invertebrates are critical food for fish and other species that inhabit large rivers. In the Colorado River Basin, invertebrates that get transported down the river (“in the drift”) are particularly important to rainbow trout and other species of interest to recreational users. This research seeks to compare rivers downstream of large dams throughout the Colorado River Basin in order to...
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Suspended-Sediment Transport Dynamics of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo

The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo (hereafter referred to as the Rio Grande) in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua, and Coahuila, MX has substantially narrowed since the early 1900s. This narrowing has been caused by the construction and operation of dams and irrigation diversions in upstream reaches of the Rio Grande in the U.S. and the Rio Conchos in Mexico that has reduced mean and peak...
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Suspended-Sediment Transport Dynamics of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo

The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo (hereafter referred to as the Rio Grande) in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua, and Coahuila, MX has substantially narrowed since the early 1900s. This narrowing has been caused by the construction and operation of dams and irrigation diversions in upstream reaches of the Rio Grande in the U.S. and the Rio Conchos in Mexico that has reduced mean and peak...
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Effects of Nonnative Vegetation Management

The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo (hereafter referred to as the Rio Grande) in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua, and Coahuila, MX has substantially narrowed since the early 1900s. This narrowing has been exacerbated by the widespread establishment of non-native giant cane (Arundo donax) and tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), both of which help trap sediment and protect banks from natural erosional...
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Effects of Nonnative Vegetation Management

The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo (hereafter referred to as the Rio Grande) in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua, and Coahuila, MX has substantially narrowed since the early 1900s. This narrowing has been exacerbated by the widespread establishment of non-native giant cane (Arundo donax) and tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), both of which help trap sediment and protect banks from natural erosional...
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SBSC Updates - Catch Up on Our Activities

SBSC monthly updates highlight new published papers and reports, new research projects, media attention on SBSC science, outreach activities, data, and more. Click on the images to download PDFs of the updates. If you would like the montly updates e-mailed to you each month, please contact Meredith Hartwell (mhartwell@usgs.gov)
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SBSC Updates - Catch Up on Our Activities

SBSC monthly updates highlight new published papers and reports, new research projects, media attention on SBSC science, outreach activities, data, and more. Click on the images to download PDFs of the updates. If you would like the montly updates e-mailed to you each month, please contact Meredith Hartwell (mhartwell@usgs.gov)
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