Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

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Keep up to date with WARC news.

Filter Total Items: 36
Date published: September 13, 2018

USGS Cool Tools for Hot Topics

WARC scientists present cool tools for hot topics at the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies 2018 Annual Meeting. 

Date published: August 21, 2018

Genetic Analysis of Florida's Invasive Pythons Reveals A Tangled Family Tree

A new genetic analysis of invasive pythons captured across South Florida finds the big constrictors are closely related to one another. In fact, most of them are genetically related as first or second cousins, according to a study by wildlife genetics experts at the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: June 13, 2018

WARC Scientists Honored for Decades of Research on Florida Manatee

U.S. Geological Survey scientists have been honored as Recovery Champions by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Southeast Region for their long-term research efforts on the Florida manatee. 

Date published: May 31, 2018

USGS Hurricane Response Met Challenges in 2017, Prepares for 2018

No one has a crystal ball to foresee what will happen during the 2018 hurricane season that begins June 1, but NOAA forecasters say there’s a 75 percent chance this hurricane season will be at least as busy as a normal year, or busier.

Date published: April 25, 2018

Invasive Cuban Treefrogs Leap Out of Florida, Establish First Known Population in Louisiana

A population of exotic invasive Cuban treefrogs has been discovered in New Orleans, more than 430 miles (700 kilometers) from the nearest known population in Florida, making this the first known breeding population in the mainland United States outside that state, reports a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

Scroll down to hear and download calls of Cuban treefrogs and two native treefrogs.

Date published: April 23, 2018

USGS Tracks How Hurricane Floodwaters Spread Non-Native Freshwater Plants and Animals

Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Nate may have spread non-native freshwater plants and animals into new water bodies, where some of them can disrupt living communities or change the landscape.

Date published: March 19, 2018

New genetic test detects manatees' recent presence in fresh or saltwater

Environmental DNA picks up traces of the elusive mammals’ saliva, skin, waste, or exhaled breaths.

 

Date published: January 19, 2018

Scientists, volunteers rescue about 1,000 cold-stunned sea turtles

Florida's second-largest turtle rescue of 21st century is “exhausting, inspiring,” USGS biologist says

Date published: October 25, 2017

Biologist starting over after Hurricane Irma damages home, office, research site

Coral reef expert Caroline Rogers was the only USGS employee in the Virgin Islands when the Category 5 storm hit.

Date published: September 19, 2017

Emerging Disease Further Jeopardizes North American Frogs

A deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey

Date published: September 13, 2017

Federal Ocean Partnership Launches DEEP SEARCH Study of Coral, Canyons, and Seeps Off the Mid- and South Atlantic Coast

Scientists beginning a three-week research cruises to study deep-sea corals, canyons and seeps departed from Norfolk, Virginia on September 12 after a one-day delay due to the effects of Hurricane Irma. USGS research oceanographer Amanda Demopoulos is the lead scientist for this cruise, the first of three planned as part of a four-and-a-half year study.

Date published: August 23, 2017

Invasive Pest May Not Be Only Cause of Recent Louisiana Marsh Die-off

A non-native insect infestation may not be the only factor involved in the ongoing die-back of a marsh grass in the Mississippi River’s “bird foot delta,” the ecologically and economically important part of coastal Louisiana where the river meets the Gulf of Mexico.