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Aerial Photogrammetry Data and Products of the North Carolina coast: 2018-10-06 to 2018-10-08, post-Hurricane Florence

June 2, 2021

This data release presents structure-from-motion products derived from imagery taken along the North Carolina coast in response to storm events and the recovery process. USGS researchers use the aerial photogrammetry data and products to assess future coastal vulnerability, nesting habitats for wildlife, and provide data for hurricane impact models. This research is part of the Remote Sensing Coastal Change Project. Products include digital elevation models and orthorectified imagery (RGB averaged products) created from aerial imagery surveys with precise Global Navigation Satellite Systen (GNSS) navigation data flown in a piloted fixed wing aircraft (available here https://coastal.er.usgs.gov/data-release/doi-P91KB9SF/). The products span the coast over both highly developed towns and natural areas, including federal lands such as Cape Lookout National Seashore and Cape Hatteras National Seashore. These products represent the coast after Hurricane Florence on October 6-8, 2018, and cover from the Cape Fear area in North Carolina to the Virginia border vicinity (Figure 1). Different products are provided in the Child Items section below and contain all segments of the coastline over multiple days of collection. To cite an individual product use the following format: Ritchie, A.C., Over, J.R., Kranenburg, C.J., Brown, J.A., Buscombe, D., Sherwood, C.R., Warrick, J.A., and Wernette, P.A, 2021, Digital Elevation Models, in Aerial Photogrammetry Data and Products of the North Carolina coast?2018-10-06 to 2018-10-08, post-Hurricane Florence: U.S Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9CA3D8P. [Data directly accessible at https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/6037cca0d34eb12031175133.] Figure 1. Map showing the geographic features used to bound the individual products to keep their size manageable. This work has been supported by the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources Program and by Congressional appropriations through the Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019 (H.R. 2157).