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Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center

Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center is one of three centers serving the mission of the USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program—the primary Federal marine geology and physical science research program responsible for the Nation’s entire coastal and marine landscape. 

News

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Cape Cod Bay Seafloor Mapping Data Available!

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Federal Career Panel

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2021 Annual Report - Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center

Publications

Comprehensive pressure core analysis for hydrate-bearing sediments from Gulf of Mexico Green Canyon Block 955, including assessments of geomechanical viscous behavior and nuclear magnetic resonance permeability

Quantifying the petrophysical and geomechanical properties of gas hydrate reservoirs is essential for understanding the natural hydrate system and predicting gas production behavior for future resource development. Pressure-core analysis tools were used to characterize methane hydrate–bearing sediments recovered from the Gulf of Mexico Green Canyon Block 955, under an international collaboration w

Revisiting 228Th as a tool for determining sedimentation and mass accumulation rates

The use of 228Th has seen limited application for determining sedimentation and mass accumulation rates in coastal and marine environments. Recent analytical advances have enabled rapid, precise measurements of particle-bound 228Th using a radium delayed coincidence counting system (RaDeCC). Herein we review the 228Th cycle in the marine environment and revisit the historical use of 228Th as a tra

Measurements of Geologic Characteristics and Geophysical Properties of Sediments From the New England Mud Patch

The characterization of physical, geological, and geophysical properties of sediments within the New England Mud Patch (NEMP) was undertaken to provide a physical basis for acoustic inversions associated with the SeaBed Characterization EXperiment 2017 (SBCEX17). Using a suite of 89 sediment cores (piston/trigger, gravity [acoustic], and vibracore), a comprehensive database of laboratory-based sed

Science

USGS Law of the Sea

The USGS Law of the Sea project helps identify the submerged extent of the U.S. land territory beyond 200 nautical miles. This land area, called the extended continental shelf (ECS), is an important maritime zone with resources and marine habitats. Its size may exceed one million square kilometers, encompassing areas in the Arctic, Atlantic, Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific west coast. USGS...
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USGS Law of the Sea

The USGS Law of the Sea project helps identify the submerged extent of the U.S. land territory beyond 200 nautical miles. This land area, called the extended continental shelf (ECS), is an important maritime zone with resources and marine habitats. Its size may exceed one million square kilometers, encompassing areas in the Arctic, Atlantic, Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific west coast. USGS...
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State of Our Nation's Coast

The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program (CMHRP) established a Coastal Change Hazards (CCH) programmatic focus to support the optimization of resources, improve the visibility of USGS coastal hazards science, and prioritize science, products, and tools that meet stakeholder needs. Important work by CMHRP scientists and staff within CCH supports hazard mitigation along our nation’s...
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State of Our Nation's Coast

The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program (CMHRP) established a Coastal Change Hazards (CCH) programmatic focus to support the optimization of resources, improve the visibility of USGS coastal hazards science, and prioritize science, products, and tools that meet stakeholder needs. Important work by CMHRP scientists and staff within CCH supports hazard mitigation along our nation’s...
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Using Video Imagery to Study Storm Events at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge

Two video cameras were temporarily mounted on a dune at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
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Using Video Imagery to Study Storm Events at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge

Two video cameras were temporarily mounted on a dune at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
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