Mineral Resources Program

News

News Releases, Technical Announcements, and other items of interest relating to the MR Program. To follow Minerals Information Periodicals, subscribe to the Mineral Periodicals RSS feed. Subscribe to the USGS Minerals News RSS feed to keep up with the latest Program news.

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Filter Total Items: 139
Date published: December 18, 2015

EarthWord – Medical Geology

Medical Geology is an earth science specialty that concerns how geologic materials and earth processes affect human health. 

Date published: December 17, 2015

U.S. Reliance on Nonfuel Mineral Imports Increasing

Key nonfuel mineral commodities that support the U.S. economy and national security are increasingly being sourced from outside the U.S., according to a new U.S. Geological Survey publication.

Date published: December 14, 2015

New Method for Ranking Global Copper Deposits Saves Time and Money

A new approach to ranking copper resources could result in identifying future supplies of copper while saving both time and money, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: December 10, 2015

USGS Reports Large Shifts in Global Primary Tantalum Mining from 2000 to 2014

Reston, VA— The United States is completely reliant on imports of tantalum, which is a commonly used element in electronics, to meet its domestic consumption for economic and national security needs. A new U.S. Geological Survey report illustrates the dramatic change of the international sources of primary mined tantalum over the past 15 years.

Date published: December 4, 2015

Low-flying Airplane Mapping Geology and Mineral Resources Over the Eastern Adirondacks

Residents of Essex and Clinton counties in New York may notice an airplane flying a grid pattern at low altitude for a few weeks in December as scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey map buried geological features that provide clues into mineral resources in the area.

Date published: December 2, 2015

Estimates of Potential Uranium in South Texas Could Equal Five Years of U.S. Needs

The uranium oxide is located in sandstone formations throughout the South Texas Coastal Plain, which borders the Gulf of Mexico. The area has long been known to contain uranium, and two mines are currently in operation, with a number of companies actively exploring for uranium.

Date published: November 18, 2015

Estimates of Undiscovered Copper in Middle East Ten Times Current World Production

More than 180 million metric tons of undiscovered copper resources may be found in an area of the Middle East that covers Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, western Pakistan and southwestern Afghanistan, according to a recent assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: October 17, 2015

Media Advisory: Low-Level Flights to Begin Assessing Local Mineral Resources this Monday

U.S. Geological Survey scientists will conduct a high-resolution airborne survey to study the rock layers under a region of northeastern Iowa, starting Monday, October 19, and lasting into November.

Date published: October 12, 2015

EarthWord: Graben

A graben is a piece of Earth’s crust that is shifted downward in comparison to adjacent crust known as “horsts,” which are shifted upward.

Date published: September 21, 2015

EarthWord: Dedolomitization

The process in which magnesium is removed from the mineral dolomite (calcium magnesium carbonate) leaving behind the minerals calcite (calcium carbonate) and periclase (magnesium oxide.)

Date published: September 7, 2015

EarthWord: Batholith

Despite sounding like something out of Harry Potter, a batholith is a type of igneous rock that forms when magma rises into the earth’s crust, but does not erupt onto the surface. The magma cools beneath the earth’s surface, forming a rock structure that extends at least one hundred square kilometers across (40 square miles), and extends to an unknown depth.

Date published: August 31, 2015

"Mutant" Fossils Reveal Toxic Metals May Have Contributed to World’s Largest Extinctions

Toxic metals such as iron, lead and arsenic may have helped cause mass extinctions in the world’s oceans millions of years ago, according to recent research from the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Center for Scientific Research, France; and Ghent University, Belgium.