How can the spread of Asian swamp eels be prevented?

The USGS focus is to document the eel’s geographic distribution and to learn as much as possible about its behavior and biology. The resulting information is considered critical in helping to develop strategies aimed at containing or controlling its spread. Meanwhile, catching and transporting Asian swamp eels for use as bait, food, or aquarium pets is highly discouraged.

Related Content

Filter Total Items: 6

How can the spread of zebra mussels be prevented?

The USGS documents the zebra mussel's geographic distribution and studies its behavior and biology. The resulting information is critical in helping to develop strategies aimed at containing and controlling the mussel's spread. Meanwhile, catching and transporting zebra mussels for use as bait, food, and aquarium pets is highly discouraged. We...

Can invasive pythons be eradicated?

The odds of eradicating an introduced population of reptiles once it has spread across a large area are very low, pointing to the importance of prevention, early detection and rapid response. And with the Burmese python now distributed across more than a thousand square miles of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park and areas...

How is the USGS helping prevent the spread of the brown treesnake?

Preventing the spread of the invasive brown treesnake is paramount. It is much cheaper than intervention once a snake population is established. Without rigorous prevention, it is extremely difficult to control (let alone remove) an introduced reptile species. In the case of the brown treesnake, prevention efforts include working to detect...

How can the spread of Asian swamp eels be prevented?

The USGS focus is to document the eel’s geographic distribution and to learn as much as possible about its behavior and biology . The resulting information is considered critical in helping to develop strategies aimed at containing or controlling its spread. Meanwhile, catching and transporting Asian swamp eels for use as bait, food, or aquarium...

Is it possible to eradicate Asian carp once they are in an area?

Eradicating an established population of Asian carp would be extremely difficult and expensive, if possible at all. Potential control methods include the use of fish poisons, physical barriers, physical removal, habitat alteration, or the addition of predators, parasites, or pathogens. Research on Asian carp control is ongoing as part of the Asian...

What is an invasive species and why are they a problem?

An invasive species is an introduced, nonnative organism (disease, parasite, plant, or animal) that begins to spread or expand its range from the site of its original introduction and that has the potential to cause harm to the environment, the economy, or to human health. A few well-known examples include the unintentional introduction of the...
Filter Total Items: 2
Date published: March 12, 2014

Parasite in Live Asian Swamp Eels May Cause Human Illness

Raw or undercooked Asian swamp eels could transmit a parasitic infection called gnathostomiasis to consumers.

Date published: March 3, 2000

USGS Scientists Find New Population of Asian Swamp Eels in South Florida

A new population of non-native Asian swamp eels, a highly adaptable predatory fish, has been found near the eastern border of Everglades National Park in the area of Homestead, Fla.

Filter Total Items: 7
Asian swamp eels (Monopterus sp.)
February 23, 2017

Asian swamp eels (Monopterus sp.)

Fish collection from Everglades NP border canal, Asian swamp eels (Monopterus sp.), sites 19-20.

Asian swamp eel (Monopterus sp.)
February 23, 2017

Asian swamp eel (Monopterus sp.)

Asian swamp eel (Monopterus sp.)

Image: Live Asian Swamp Eels Sold in a U.S. Market
March 14, 2016

Live Asian Swamp Eels Sold in a U.S. Market

These live Asian swamp eels were imported from southeast Asia and sold in an urban food market in the U.S. Raw or undercooked Asian swamp eels could transmit a parasitic infection called gnathostomiasis to consumers, and wild eels could become widespread in some U.S. waters.

Image: Live Asian Swamp Eels Sold in a U.S. Market
March 14, 2016

Live Asian Swamp Eels Sold in a U.S. Market

These live Asian swamp eels were imported from southeast Asia and sold in an urban food market in the U.S. Raw or undercooked Asian swamp eels could transmit a parasitic infection called gnathostomiasis to consumers, and wild eels could become widespread in some U.S. waters.

USGS
June 16, 2009

How did Asian swamp eels get here?

Listen to hear the answer.

USGS
July 23, 2008

What do Asian swamp eels eat?

Starting next Wednesday, July 30, CoreFacts will be delivered once a week instead of daily, in order to bring you better content. Please let us know how you feel about CoreFacts via an e-mail to corecast@usgs.gov. Listen to hear the answer.

video thumbnail: Asian Swamp Eels: Predation on Juvenile Largemouth Bass
June 29, 2006

Asian Swamp Eels: Predation on Juvenile Largemouth Bass

Non-native or introduced populations of Asian Swamp Eels (family: Synbranchidae) exist in the wild in parts of Florida, Georgia, and Hawaii. This video shows predatory behavior of captive individuals. Swamp eels shown feeding in this video include two different species, the first (tentatively identified as Monopterus albus) is a wild-caught specimen taken from Florida

...