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Great Lakes Science Center

Welcome!  The Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) is part of the Great Lakes Region 3 of the USGS. Our scientists work in the Great Lakes region and other parts of the country to meet the nation’s need for scientific information used by resource managers to restore, enhance, manage, and protect the living resources and habitats in the Great Lakes basin. 

News

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GLSC Paper Receives AFS Award For The Best Genetics Paper Published In An AFS Journal In 2020

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Kowalski to deliver invited presentation at the 2022 Canadian National Phragmites Conference

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Media Advisory: Sailing Drones Collect Data for Great Lakes Fishery Research

Publications

Importance of nonindigenous harpacticoids (Crustacea: Copepoda) decrease with depth in Lake Ontario

Harpacticoid copepods can be a substantial component of the meiobenthic community in lakes and serve an ecological role as detritivores. Here we present the first species-level lake-wide quantitative assessment of the harpacticoid assemblage of Lake Ontario with emphasis on the status of nonindigenous species. Additionally, we provide COI-5P sequences of harpacticoid taxa through Barcode of Life D

Seasonal variability of invertebrate prey diet and selectivity of the dominant forage fishes in Lake Huron

Predators can shift their diets and even selectivity in response to changing environmental conditions. Since the early 2000s, Lake Huron experienced major food-web shifts that have caused changes in the prey availability and quality for consumers at multiple trophic levels. Previous studies have reported declining energetic condition for key planktivorous fishes, such as bloater (Coregonus hoyi) a

Invasive sea lamprey detection and characterization using interdigitated electrode (IDE) contact sensor

The ability to monitor invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes is critical to protecting the region’s $ 7 billion USD fishing industry and preserving its biodiversity. Monitoring these invaders requires considerable fieldwork and human power, making remote lamprey detection systems attractive for their continuous monitoring capabilities and potential for

Science

Hammond Bay Biological Station

In Partnership with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission
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Hammond Bay Biological Station

In Partnership with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission
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Grass Carp in Lake Erie

Grass Carp, commonly used in aquaculture to control plant growth, escaped captivity in the Mississippi River and have been in the Great Lakes since 1975. Spawning surveys have documented spawning since 2015 in the Sandusky River leading to expanded surveys and an effort to confine reproduction to the western part of Lake Erie.
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Grass Carp in Lake Erie

Grass Carp, commonly used in aquaculture to control plant growth, escaped captivity in the Mississippi River and have been in the Great Lakes since 1975. Spawning surveys have documented spawning since 2015 in the Sandusky River leading to expanded surveys and an effort to confine reproduction to the western part of Lake Erie.
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Coregonine restoration in the Great Lakes- David Bunnell

The principals of conservation biology are waiting to be applied to restore native coregonines in the Great Lakes. Native fishes have suffered extinctions and extirpations owing to loss of habitat, interactions with invasive species, and overfishing, and now fishery managers are committed to their restoration.
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Coregonine restoration in the Great Lakes- David Bunnell

The principals of conservation biology are waiting to be applied to restore native coregonines in the Great Lakes. Native fishes have suffered extinctions and extirpations owing to loss of habitat, interactions with invasive species, and overfishing, and now fishery managers are committed to their restoration.
Learn More