What can I do to be prepared for an earthquake?

There are four basic steps you can take to be more prepared for an earthquake:

Step 1:
Secure your space by identifying hazards and securing moveable items.

Step 2:
Plan to be safe by creating a disaster plan and deciding how you will communicate in an emergency.

Step 3:
Organize disaster supplies in convenient locations.

Step 4:
Minimize financial hardship by organizing important documents, strengthening your property, and considering insurance.

These are recommended by the Earthquake Country Alliance, in which USGS is a partner.

Learn more: Preparedness Information - Earthquake Hazards Program

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DO NOT turn on the gas again if you turned it off; let the gas company do it DO NOT use matches, lighters, camp stoves or barbecues, electrical equipment, appliances UNTIL you are sure there are no gas leaks. They may create a spark that could ignite leaking gas and cause an explosion and fire DO NOT use your telephone, EXCEPT for a medical or...

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If you are INDOORS -- STAY THERE! Get under a desk or table and hang on to it ( Drop, Cover, and Hold on! ) or move into a hallway or against an inside wall. STAY CLEAR of windows, fireplaces, and heavy furniture or appliances. GET OUT of the kitchen, which is a dangerous place (things can fall on you). DON'T run downstairs or rush outside while...
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