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Nonindigenous Species

Nonindigenous species are those that are not native to a particular area, or are found living outside of their historic range. Also known as non-native, exotic, or alien species, these species do not necessarily cause harm to the environment in which they are found. However, when these species establish themselves and threaten the diversity or stability of a native species or environment, they are then considered invasive.
Filter Total Items: 55

Fish Slam December 2023

Fifty-four biologists from nine organizations, including USGS, participated in a two-day Fish Slam event on December 13 - 14, 2023 in Southwest Florida.
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Fish Slam December 2023

Fifty-four biologists from nine organizations, including USGS, participated in a two-day Fish Slam event on December 13 - 14, 2023 in Southwest Florida.
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Fish Slam May 2023

Fish Slam events link research institutions such as museums and universities with federal, state, and local government agencies that possess expertise and field equipment to collect nonnative fishes, providing unique access to specimens for these institutions.
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Fish Slam May 2023

Fish Slam events link research institutions such as museums and universities with federal, state, and local government agencies that possess expertise and field equipment to collect nonnative fishes, providing unique access to specimens for these institutions.
Learn More

Fish Chat and Slam December 2022

Fifty-seven fish biologists from 12 organizations participated in a three-day Fish Chat and Slam event in South Florida.
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Fish Chat and Slam December 2022

Fifty-seven fish biologists from 12 organizations participated in a three-day Fish Chat and Slam event in South Florida.
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Southwest Florida Fish Slam – Spring 2022

Forty-two fish biologists from seven organizations participated in a two-day Spring Fish Slam event in southwest Florida. Fourteen species of non-native fishes were collected or observed.
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Southwest Florida Fish Slam – Spring 2022

Forty-two fish biologists from seven organizations participated in a two-day Spring Fish Slam event in southwest Florida. Fourteen species of non-native fishes were collected or observed.
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USGS Coordinated Burmese Python Research Strategy for South Florida (FY21 – FY27)

Wetland and Aquatic Research Center and Fort Collins Science Center are coordinating a long-term, landscape-scale Burmese python research strategy for South Florida.
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USGS Coordinated Burmese Python Research Strategy for South Florida (FY21 – FY27)

Wetland and Aquatic Research Center and Fort Collins Science Center are coordinating a long-term, landscape-scale Burmese python research strategy for South Florida.
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Across Trophic Level System Simulation (ATLSS) Program for the Greater Everglades

Goals of the ATLSS Program are to help achieve a better understanding of components of the Everglades ecosystem, to provide an integrative tool for empirical studies, and to apply these tools to an adaptive management framework.
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Across Trophic Level System Simulation (ATLSS) Program for the Greater Everglades

Goals of the ATLSS Program are to help achieve a better understanding of components of the Everglades ecosystem, to provide an integrative tool for empirical studies, and to apply these tools to an adaptive management framework.
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Understanding Greater Everglades Mammal Communities within and adjacent to the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

WARC Researchers are using a variety of methods to assess mammal communities across the Greater Everglades.
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Virtual Fish Slam - March 2021

In March 2021, USGS researchers and partners conducted the first-ever Virtual Fish Slam. The bi-annual Fish Slam event helps monitor new introductions and document range expansion of known non-native freshwater fishes.
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Virtual Fish Slam - March 2021

In March 2021, USGS researchers and partners conducted the first-ever Virtual Fish Slam. The bi-annual Fish Slam event helps monitor new introductions and document range expansion of known non-native freshwater fishes.
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Early Detection and Rapid Response: Removal of Newly Introduced Non-native Marine Fishes to Prevent Invasions

USGS WARC works with partners on early detection and rapid response (ED/RR) efforts, rapidly removing newly introduced non-native marine fishes from Florida’s coastal waters to prevent invasions.
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Early Detection and Rapid Response: Removal of Newly Introduced Non-native Marine Fishes to Prevent Invasions

USGS WARC works with partners on early detection and rapid response (ED/RR) efforts, rapidly removing newly introduced non-native marine fishes from Florida’s coastal waters to prevent invasions.
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Non-native Marine Fishes: Tracking Distributions with the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database

WARC scientists work with local partners to verify and document sightings of non-native marine fishes.
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Non-native Marine Fishes: Tracking Distributions with the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database

WARC scientists work with local partners to verify and document sightings of non-native marine fishes.
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Monitoring and Removal of Invasive Cuban Treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) on the Gulf Coast

WARC researchers are performing visual encounter surveys and passively capturing Cuban treefrogs to remove as many of the invasive anurans as possible.
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Monitoring and Removal of Invasive Cuban Treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) on the Gulf Coast

WARC researchers are performing visual encounter surveys and passively capturing Cuban treefrogs to remove as many of the invasive anurans as possible.
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Diet and Reproductive Phenology in a Recently Established Population of Invasive Cuban Treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis)

WARC researchers are exploring relationships between body size, time of year, sex, and reproductive development to better understand the reproductive phenology of the New Orleans population of Cuban treefrogs compared to Florida populations.
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Diet and Reproductive Phenology in a Recently Established Population of Invasive Cuban Treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis)

WARC researchers are exploring relationships between body size, time of year, sex, and reproductive development to better understand the reproductive phenology of the New Orleans population of Cuban treefrogs compared to Florida populations.
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