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Mono Lake Volcanic Field

Find U.S. Volcano

The Mono Lake volcanic field, east of Yosemite National Park and north of the Mono Craters, consists of vents within Mono Lake and on its north shore. The most recent eruptive activity in the Long Valley to Mono Lake region took place about 300 years ago, when lake-bottom sediments forming much of Paoha Island were uplifted by intrusion of a rhyolitic cryptodome.

Quick Facts

Location: California, Mono County

Latitude: 38° N

Longitude: 119.03° W

Elevation: 2,121 (m) 6,959 (f)

Volcano type: volcanic field

Composition: basalt to rhyolite

Most recent eruption: 300 years ago

Nearby towns: Lee Vining

Threat Potential: Moderate*

*based on the National Volcano Early Warning System

Summary

The most topographically prominent feature of Mono Lake volcanic field is Black Point, which rises above the northwest shore. It was formed as a sublacustral (below lake level) basaltic cone about 13,300 years ago when the water level at Mono Lake was higher. Lava domes and flows from Negit and parts of Paoha islands within Mono Lake. The most recent eruptive activity in the Long Valley to Mono Lake region took place about 300 years ago when lake-bottom sediments forming much of Paoha Island were uplifted by the intrusion of a rhyolitic crypto dome. Spectacular tufa towers line the shores of Mono Lake.

News

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Having a (volcanic) field day in California

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New survey plumbs Mono Lake's depths for hydrothermal heat

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Unpacking CalVO's new seismic monitoring boxes

Publications

California’s exposure to volcanic hazards

The potential for damaging earthquakes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, and wildfires is widely recognized in California. The same cannot be said for volcanic eruptions, despite the fact that they occur in the state about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault. At least ten eruptions have taken place in the past 1,000 years, and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable.The

Authors
Margaret Mangan, Jessica Ball, Nathan Wood, Jamie L. Jones, Jeff Peters, Nina Abdollahian, Laura Dinitz, Sharon Blankenheim, Johanna Fenton, Cynthia Pridmore

2018 update to the U.S. Geological Survey national volcanic threat assessment

When erupting, all volcanoes pose a degree of risk to people and infrastructure, however, the risks are not equivalent from one volcano to another because of differences in eruptive style and geographic location. Assessing the relative threats posed by U.S. volcanoes identifies which volcanoes warrant the greatest risk-mitigation efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners. This update

Authors
John W. Ewert, Angela K. Diefenbach, David W. Ramsey

The California Volcano Observatory: Monitoring the state's restless volcanoes

Volcanic eruptions happen in the State of California about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have taken place in California in the past 1,000 years—most recently at Lassen Peak in Lassen Volcanic National Park (1914 to 1917) in the northern part of the State—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The U.S. Geological Survey Californ

Authors
Wendy K. Stovall, Mae Marcaida, Margaret T. Mangan

Science

Paoha and Negit Islands, Mono Lake, California

The islands of Mono Lake were built by recent eruptions of lava and cinder and by uplift of the shallow lake bottom caused by the rise of magma beneath the lake. The two islands are less than about 2,000 years old, and the lava flows on the north flank of Paoha Island are only about 250 years old.
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Paoha and Negit Islands, Mono Lake, California

The islands of Mono Lake were built by recent eruptions of lava and cinder and by uplift of the shallow lake bottom caused by the rise of magma beneath the lake. The two islands are less than about 2,000 years old, and the lava flows on the north flank of Paoha Island are only about 250 years old.
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Seismic monitoring at Mono Lake Volcanic Field

The seismometers located near the Mono Lake volcanic field are part of the greater Long Valley Caldera seismic network array.
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Seismic monitoring at Mono Lake Volcanic Field

The seismometers located near the Mono Lake volcanic field are part of the greater Long Valley Caldera seismic network array.
Learn More

Geology and History of Mono Lake Volcanic Field

The Mono Lake volcanic field east of Yosemite National Park and north of the Mono Craters consists of vents within Mono Lake and on its north shore.
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Geology and History of Mono Lake Volcanic Field

The Mono Lake volcanic field east of Yosemite National Park and north of the Mono Craters consists of vents within Mono Lake and on its north shore.
Learn More