Natural Hazards

News

Filter Total Items: 509
Date published: January 15, 2014

20 Years After Northridge Quake, Buildings Remain Vulnerable

Twenty years ago this week an earthquake struck Northridge, Calif., killing 57 people and revealing a serious defect in a common type of mid-rise building. A new study by U.S. Geological Survey and Caltech engineers, shows that these mid-rise buildings with fracture-prone welds in their steel frames are much more dangerous than they would be if they met current standards.

Date published: January 9, 2014

Potential Geothermal Resources for Akutan, Alaska

Akutan Island, in Alaska’s east-central Aleutian Islands, hosts the City of Akutan and is home to the largest seafood production facility in North America. It also hosts Akutan Volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in the U.S.

Date published: January 8, 2014

New Sensor Network to Detail Virginia Earthquakes

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Virginia Tech will install a 20-station seismic network in the central Virginia area beginning Jan. 8. The new sensors – each about the size of a soda can – will provide information to help the researchers study the background seismicity in the area and any continuing aftershocks of the Aug. 23, 2011 earthquake near Louisa and Mineral, Va.

Date published: January 8, 2014

Stories of Lava Flows and Volcanic Landscapes from Ka`ū to North Kona Featured in Public Talk

The lava flows and volcanic landscapes along Māmalahoa and Queen Ka‘ahumanu Highways, from Ka‘ū to North Kona, will be the focus of a public talk offered by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists on Wed., Jan. 22.

Date published: January 3, 2014

Geophysical Studies Reveal Potential Quake Hazard in Spokane Area

Preliminary interpretations of a recent geophysical survey confirm the presence of earthquake faults and reveal the possibility of previously unknown faults beneath the greater Spokane area.

Date published: October 28, 2010

Earthquake Sensors Available to a Good Home

PASADENA, Calif. – The agency responsible for earthquake monitoring across the United States is looking for 35 volunteers in Southern California to host an earthquake sensor in their home.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: October 17, 2010

Haiti Earthquake Shaking Amplified by Local Landforms

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — The severe damage and loss-of-life caused by the devastating January 2010 M7.0 earthquake in Haiti was exacerbated by amplification of shaking due to local geological conditions and landforms in Port-au-Prince, according to a study published online today in Nature Geoscience.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: October 10, 2010

Unraveling Complexity of Haiti Quake Reveals Hidden Faults and Future Hazards

The January 2010 M7.0 earthquake that devastated Haiti’s economy and caused over 200,000 casualties also resulted in significant uplift of the ground surface along Haiti’s coastline, and involved slip on multiple faults, according to a study published online in Nature Geoscience.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: October 1, 2010

Global Consortium of Space Agencies to Meet at USGS

The U.S. Geological Survey will host the 24th Secretariat and Board meetings of the International Charter for Space and Major Disasters in Washington, D.C. on October 4-7, 2010.

Date published: September 29, 2010

Global Earthquake Alerts to Include Economic Loss and Casualty Information

Estimated economic loss and casualty information will now be included in earthquake alerts sent out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) following significant earthquakes around the world. 

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: September 28, 2010

Volcanic activity in Arabian Desert makes Case for Increased Monitoring

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Underground magma movement was the trigger of a swarm of 30,000 earthquakes in Saudi Arabia last year, according to a new study published in Nature Geoscience Sunday.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: August 25, 2010

An island’s rebirth: Life emerges after a catastrophic volcanic eruption

Anchorage, Alaska — A secluded island in the Aleutian chain is revealing secrets of how land and marine ecosystems react to and recover from a catastrophic volcanic eruption that appeared at first glance to destroy all life on the island.