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May 1, 2021

YVO Update of Activity at Yellowstone and Plans for Summer Fieldwork

It's May, the snow is melting and the roads are mostly open, so it's time for geologists, geophysicist and geochemists to head into Yellowstone to start projects they have been planning for the last several months. Next week, a field team will deploy a temporary GPS network to help “densify” the network of continuous GPS stations already in place. The temporary GPS

April 20, 2021

Mitigating Hazards at Cascade Range Volcanoes

The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was monumental in so many different ways. It had a huge impact on the geography of southwestern Washington, ash affected many people, lives were lost, and lessons were learned. The eruption also led to the creation of the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington. Seth Moran talks about three of CVO’s mission areas—

April 17, 2021

Kīlauea Summit Lava Lake (April 17, 2021)

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, remains active. This video is shown at 30x speed and shows the lava supplying the lake from the western fissure, with scattered crustal foundering across the lake surface. 
 

April 17, 2021

Kīlauea Lava Lake Inlet (April 17, 2021)

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, remains active. This video is shown at 20x speed and shows the lava supplying the lake from the western fissure. 
 

April 17, 2021

Kīlauea West Fissure Spatter (April 17, 2021)

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, remains active. This video shows spattering from a small vent at the western fissure. 
 

April 16, 2021

Kīlauea Summit Overflight (April 16, 2021)

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted a routine helicopter overflight of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Active surface lava remains limited to a small area in the western portion of the lake, with the eastern portion solidified at the surface.

April 16, 2021

Kīlauea Lava Lake (April 16, 2021)

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists visited the east rim of Halema‘uma‘u Crater to make observations of Kīlauea's summit lava lake and survey the eastern portion of the crater. This video compilation shows different aspects of the lake activity in the western portion of the crater. 

April 13, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u Lava Lake Inlet (April 13, 2021)

This video shows the inlet along the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was moving slowly but steadily, and was emerging beneath a portion of crust attached to the lake margin. The video is shown at 10x speed.
 

April 13, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u gas plume (April 13, 2021)

KPcam webcam on the flank of Mauna Loa looks south towards the summit of Kīlauea to monitor the gas plume from the active lava lake. This time-lapse video shows a typical day for the summit plume. Clear views in the night and morning show the low, ground-hugging plume carried to the southwest by the tradewinds. The plume is blocked from view by afternoon rain clouds. In

April 6, 2021

CVO Monitoring Program: Keeping an Eye on Cascade Volcanoes

The good news is that volcanoes usually change behavior before they erupt, in ways that are detectable by monitoring instruments. During times of relative quiet, scientists use different sensors and instruments to help visualize and quantify the structures and processes that are occurring beneath a volcano so they can provide a better estimate of what might happen when a

Photograph of cabinets in the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center Sediment Analysis Lab
April 1, 2021

Woods Hole Sed Lab's collection of sieves.

Photograph of cabinets in the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center Sediment Analysis Laboratory contaning the lab's collection of sieves.

Photograph of Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Sed Lab equipment
April 1, 2021

Woods Hole Sed Lab's Horiba LA-960 laser defraction unit

Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center Sediment Analysis Laboratory's Horiba LA-960 laser diffraction unit with slurry sampler (USGS laboratory equipment number WH-SED-Horiba-LA9601).