Landslide Hazards Program

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Filter Total Items: 38
Date published: April 13, 2021

Women of Hazards Featured During Women’s History Month on @USGS_Quakes Instagram

For Women’s History Month in March 2021 the @USGS_Quakes Instagram featured dozens of photos of female earthquake scientists and shout-outs with the hashtag #EarthquakeWomen from the Earthquake Science Center, Geologic Hazards Science Center and the Office of Communications and Publishing (OCAP).

March 26, 2021

Natural Hazards Newsletter - Vol. 2 | Issue Spring 2021

In this issue: When will Mauna Loa next Erupt?, ShakeOut rollout to the Pacific Northwest, Big Sur Landslides, new storymaps for earthquakes and wildfire science, expanding coverage of the "Total Water Level and Coastal Change Forecast" tools, New Reducing Risk 2021 projects, and more.

Date published: March 23, 2021

CONNECT! Natural Hazards Mission Area Facebook Account Exceeds 20K Followers, and New @USGS_Quakes Twitter Account Now Has More Than 200K Followers

Through coordinated communication activities, the Natural Hazards Mission Area is committed to sharing news and science with broad audiences. Social media is an important part of this communications portfolio.

Date published: February 25, 2021

Post-wildfire Landslides Becoming More Frequent in Southern California

Southern California can now expect to see post-wildfire landslides occurring almost every year, with major events expected roughly every ten years, a new study led by U.S. Geological Survey researchers finds.

Date published: February 17, 2021

How Often Do Rainstorms Cause Debris Flows in Burned Areas of the Southwestern U.S.?

In the SW U.S., wildfires and intense rainfall are both common occurrences. In burned areas, short bursts of heavy rain over steep terrain can produce debris flows more so than in unburned areas due to changes in ground surface. How often do these events tend to occur?

Read the new Science for Everyone article: ...

Date published: February 16, 2021

Bond Fire Debris Flows, California: January 25 and 28, 2021

A new geonarrative (Esri Story Map) summarizes the debris flows that were caused by a rainstorm following the Bond Fire in California.

Date published: January 7, 2021

Post-Wildfire Debris Flow Awareness

Post-wildfire hazards in Colorado can be as dangerous as the fires themselves.

December 8, 2020

Natural Hazards Newsletter - Inaugural Issue - Vol. 1 | Issue Winter 2021

We introduce the USGS Natural Hazards newsletter. In this issue: A new geonarrative about the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake, Potential landslide in Alaska, Subduction Zone Science, Post-wildfire debris flow assessments, new @USGS_Quakes Twitter account, Mapping faults in Puerto Rico, Coastal Change Top Story, Photo Round Up and more!

Date published: September 29, 2020

National Preparedness Month 2020: Landslides and Sinkholes

Natural hazards have the potential to impact a majority of Americans every year. USGS science provides part of the foundation for emergency preparedness whenever and wherever disaster strikes.

Date published: August 18, 2020

Barry Arm Landslide and Tsunami Hazard

A large steep slope in the Barry Arm fjord 30 miles (50 kilometers) northeast of Whittier, Alaska has the potential to fall into the water and generate a tsunami that could have devastating local effects on those who live, work, and recreate in and around Whittier and in northern Prince William Sound.

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Date published: May 12, 2020

Announcing Gavin Hayes as USGS Senior Science Advisor for Earthquake & Geologic Hazards

On May 10, Gavin Hayes takes on the role of Senior Science Advisor for Earthquake and Geologic Hazards within the USGS Natural Hazards Mission Area.  The Senior Science Advisor serves as the coordinator for the Earthquake Hazards, Global Seismographic Network, and Geomagnetism Programs and provides oversight and guidance across the full breadth of USGS geohazard-related activities.

Date published: March 19, 2020

New USGS map can help Puerto Rico deal with risk of landslides after hurricanes

A new U.S. Geological Survey map of Puerto Rico shows the relative risks of landslides due to the kind of intense rainfall brought on by hurricanes. It identifies 20%  of the island as at high risk, 9% at very high risk, and 1% at extremely high risk of landslides under those conditions.