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Landslide Hazards Program

The primary objective of the National Landslide Hazards Program is to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

News

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Assessing landslide risks in Prince William Sound 

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Post-fire Hydrologic Response Along the Central California Coast

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The Monitor Newsletter - Vol. 12 | Issue July 2023 - Vol. 12 | Issue July 2023

Publications

Satellite Interferometry Landslide Detection and Preliminary Tsunamigenic Plausibility Assessment in Prince William Sound, Southcentral Alaska

Regional mapping of actively deforming landslides, including measurements of landslide velocity, is integral for hazard assessments in paraglacial environments. These inventories are also critical for describing the potential impacts that the warming effects of climate change have on slope instability in mountainous and cryospheric terrain. The objective of this study is to identify slow-moving la

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Lauren N. Schaefer, Jinwook Kim, Dennis M. Staley, Zhong Lu, Katherine R. Barnhart

The 2022 Chaos Canyon landslide in Colorado: Insights revealed by seismic analysis, field investigations, and remote sensing

An unusual, high-alpine, rapid debris slide originating in ice-rich debris occurred on June 28, 2022, at 16:33:16 MDT at the head of Chaos Canyon, a formerly glacier-covered valley in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA. In this study, we integrate eyewitness videos and seismic records of the event with meteorological data, field observations, pre- and post-event satellite imagery, and uncrewed
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Kate E. Allstadt, Jeffrey A. Coe, Elaine Collins, Francis K. Rengers, Anne Mangeney, Scott M. Esser, Jana Pursley, William L. Yeck, John Bellini, Lance R. Brady

Kinematic evolution of a large paraglacial landslide in the Barry Arm fjord of Alaska

Our warming climate is adversely affecting cryospheric landscapes via glacial retreat, permafrost degradation, and associated slope destabilization. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, the rapid retreat of Barry Glacier has destabilized the slopes flanking the glacier, resulting in numerous landslides. The largest of these landslides (∼500 Mm3 in volume) is more than 2 km wide and has the potential t
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Lauren N. Schaefer, Jeffrey A. Coe, Katreen Wikstrom Jones, Brian D. Collins, Dennis M. Staley, Michael E. West, Ezgi Karasozen, Charles Prentice-James Miles, Gabriel J. Wolken, Ronald P. Daanan, Kelli Wadsworth Baxstrom

Science

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Las Lomas Landslide Monitoring Station - Recent Conditions

Recent Monitoring Data
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Postfire Landslide Monitoring Station: “Las Lomas” (2016 Fish Fire) near Duarte, California

Wildfire can increase landslide susceptibility in mountainous terrain. The USGS maintains postfire landslide monitoring stations to track hillslope hydrologic conditions in the years following fire.
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Postfire Landslide Monitoring Station: “Las Lomas” (2016 Fish Fire) near Duarte, California

Wildfire can increase landslide susceptibility in mountainous terrain. The USGS maintains postfire landslide monitoring stations to track hillslope hydrologic conditions in the years following fire.
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Añasco, Puerto Rico Landslide Monitoring Station

The Añasco monitoring station is located in the eastern part of the coastal Añasco municipality. The station is located in a highly vegetated area underlain by the Lago Garzas Formation. A fence was built around the enclosure to deter grazing cows on the hillslope.
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Añasco, Puerto Rico Landslide Monitoring Station

The Añasco monitoring station is located in the eastern part of the coastal Añasco municipality. The station is located in a highly vegetated area underlain by the Lago Garzas Formation. A fence was built around the enclosure to deter grazing cows on the hillslope.
Learn More