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Landslide Hazards Program

The primary objective of the National Landslide Hazards Program is to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

News

From Ashes to Alerts: Science Helps Protect Colorado Travelers

From Ashes to Alerts: Science Helps Protect Colorado Travelers

USGS Seeks Landslide Risk Reduction Proposals

USGS Seeks Landslide Risk Reduction Proposals

Assessing landslide risks in Prince William Sound 

Assessing landslide risks in Prince William Sound 

Publications

Debris-flow entrainment modelling under climate change: Considering antecedent moisture conditions along the flow path

Debris-flow volumes can increase along their flow path by entraining sediment stored in the channel bed and banks, thus also increasing hazard potential. Theoretical considerations, laboratory experiments and field investigations all indicate that the saturation conditions of the sediment along the flow path can greatly influence the amount of sediment entrained. However, this process is usually n
Authors
Anna Könz, Jacob Hirschberg, Brian McArdell, Benjamin B. Mirus, Tjalling de Haas, Perry Bartelt, Peter Molnar

Assessing locations susceptible to shallow landslide initiation during prolonged intense rainfall in the Lares, Utuado, and Naranjito municipalities of Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria induced about 70 000 landslides throughout Puerto Rico, USA, including thousands each in three municipalities situated in Puerto Rico's rugged Cordillera Central range. By combining a nonlinear soil-depth model, presumed wettest-case pore pressures, and quasi-three-dimensional (3D) slope-stability analysis, we developed a landslide susceptibility map that has very good performance
Authors
Rex L. Baum, Dianne L. Brien, Mark E. Reid, William Schulz, Matthew J. Tello

Evaluation of debris-flow building damage forecasts

Reliable forecasts of building damage due to debris flows may provide situational awareness and guide land and emergency management decisions. Application of debris-flow runout models to generate such forecasts requires combining hazard intensity predictions with fragility functions that link hazard intensity with building damage. In this study, we evaluated the performance of building damage fore
Authors
Katherine R. Barnhart, Christopher R. Miller, Francis K. Rengers, Jason W. Kean

Science

Improving Postfire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessments In The Pacific Northwest Through Application Of Debris-Flow Models

As part of the Post-fire Hazards and Impacts to Resources and Ecosystems (PHIRE): Support for Response, Recovery, and Mitigation Project, the PHIRE Debris Flow Hazard team is engaging in several studies to better understand the spatial and temporal drivers of postfire debris flows and improve postfire hazard assessments across northern California and the Pacific Northwest.
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Improving Postfire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessments In The Pacific Northwest Through Application Of Debris-Flow Models

As part of the Post-fire Hazards and Impacts to Resources and Ecosystems (PHIRE): Support for Response, Recovery, and Mitigation Project, the PHIRE Debris Flow Hazard team is engaging in several studies to better understand the spatial and temporal drivers of postfire debris flows and improve postfire hazard assessments across northern California and the Pacific Northwest.
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Landslide Mechanisms and Forecasting

When and where will landslides happen? How far will they go, how big and how fast will they be? These questions are difficult to answer because many factors contribute to landslide occurrence, magnitude, and mobility; some factors remain unknown, while nearly all are very difficult to quantify and account for. Researchers use surface, subsurface, remote sensing, and laboratory observations along...
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Landslide Mechanisms and Forecasting

When and where will landslides happen? How far will they go, how big and how fast will they be? These questions are difficult to answer because many factors contribute to landslide occurrence, magnitude, and mobility; some factors remain unknown, while nearly all are very difficult to quantify and account for. Researchers use surface, subsurface, remote sensing, and laboratory observations along...
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Las Lomas Landslide Monitoring Station - Recent Conditions

Recent Monitoring Data
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