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Landslide Hazards

The primary objective of the National Landslide Hazards Program is to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

News

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The Monitor newsletter - Vol. 5 | Issue Winter 2022

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First Draft of the SZ4D Implementation Plan

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The Monitor newsletter - Vol. 4 | Issue Fall 2021

Publications

Geologic controls of slow-moving landslides near the U.S. West Coast

Slow-moving landslides, often with nearly imperceptible creeping motion, are an important landscape shaper and a dangerous natural hazard across the globe, yet their spatial distribution and geologic controls are still poorly known owing to a paucity of detailed, large-area observations. Here, we use interferometry of L-band satellite radar images to reveal 617 spatially large (4 × 104–13 × 106 m2

Hazard analysis of landslides triggered by Typhoon Chata’an on July 2, 2002, in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia

More than 250 landslides were triggered across the eastern volcanic islands of Chuuk State in the Federated States of Micronesia by torrential rainfall from tropical storm Chata’an on July 2, 2002. Landslides triggered during nearly 20 inches of rainfall in less than 24 hours caused 43 fatalities and the destruction or damage of 231 structures, including homes, schools, community centers, and medi

Preliminary assessment of the wave generating potential from landslides at Barry Arm, Prince William Sound, Alaska

We simulated the concurrent rapid motion of landslides on an unstable slope at Barry Arm, Alaska. Movement of landslides into the adjacent fjord displaced fjord water and generated a tsunami, which propagated out of Barry Arm. Rather than assuming an initial sea surface height, velocity, and location for the tsunami, we generated the tsunami directly using a model capable of simulating the dynamic

Science

Barry Arm, Alaska, Tsunami Hazard Maybe Not So Severe

...however, wave height could still be hazardous to Whittier and other nearshore communities in Prince William Sound.
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Barry Arm, Alaska, Tsunami Hazard Maybe Not So Severe

...however, wave height could still be hazardous to Whittier and other nearshore communities in Prince William Sound.
Learn More

Rainfall-Induced Landslides in Puerto Rico

In September 2017 Hurricane María triggered more than 70,000 landslides across Puerto Rico that caused loss of life and widespread damage to transportation, communication, and power-supply infrastructure, and to other public and private property.
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Rainfall-Induced Landslides in Puerto Rico

In September 2017 Hurricane María triggered more than 70,000 landslides across Puerto Rico that caused loss of life and widespread damage to transportation, communication, and power-supply infrastructure, and to other public and private property.
Learn More

Barry Arm, Alaska Landslide and Tsunami Monitoring

A large steep slope in the Barry Arm fjord 30 miles (50 kilometers) northeast of Whittier, Alaska has the potential to fall into the water and generate a tsunami that could have devastating local effects on those who live, work, and recreate in and around Whittier and in northern Prince William Sound.
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Barry Arm, Alaska Landslide and Tsunami Monitoring

A large steep slope in the Barry Arm fjord 30 miles (50 kilometers) northeast of Whittier, Alaska has the potential to fall into the water and generate a tsunami that could have devastating local effects on those who live, work, and recreate in and around Whittier and in northern Prince William Sound.
Learn More