Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

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Map of selected earthquakes beneath a portion of southeast Hawaii
December 31, 2018

Map of selected earthquakes beneath a portion of southeast Hawaii

Map of selected earthquakes beneath a portion of southeast Hawai`i from May 4, 2018 to March 14, 2019, showing principally aftershocks following May 4, 2018 M6.9 earthquake. Black dots indicate epicenters of 13,083 earthquakes located during this time interval; yellow stars show locations of the M6.9 earthquake and the March 13, 2019 M5.5 earthquake.

Lava flow thickness 2018
December 31, 2018

Lava flow thickness 2018

This preliminary thickness map of Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 lower East Rift Zone lava flows was calculated by subtracting pre-eruption ground surface elevations from post-eruption ground surface elevations mapped with USGS Unmanned Aerial System (drone) flights. The drones acquired 2,800 aerial photos from which 1.5 billion common points were automatically selected by Surface

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midwinter dawn at Halema‘uma‘u
December 20, 2018

midwinter dawn at Halema‘uma‘u

A midwinter dawn at Halema‘uma‘u on Kīlauea. Steaming cracks tell of water and heat interacting beneath the summit caldera of the volcano. In the background, the first rays of sunlight illuminate Uēkahuna Bluff.

Kīlauea Volcano showing the main collapse area
November 8, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano showing the main collapse area

September 19, 2018 USGS photo of the south caldera of Kīlauea Volcano showing the main collapse area. The south Sulphur Bank is in the left side of the photo. Uēkahuna Bluff, from where this photo was taken, cuts across the bottom and lower right corner of the photo. After the collapse of 1868, the caldera floor may have looked something like this.

November 7, 2018

3D model of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō's crater

This 3D model of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō's crater was created from thermal images during an overflight of the cone. The deepest portion of the crater is about 320 meters (1050 feet) below the crater floor that existed prior to April 30.

Sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide gases
November 6, 2018

Sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide gases

Sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide gases themselves are not visible, but dramatic plumes are sometimes visible at Kīlauea Volcano's summit (shown here) and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. These plumes are a result of atmospheric conditions rather than increased volcanic activity, and frequently occur when warm volcanic gases condense as they are released into cooler air temperatures of early

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View into fissure 8
November 4, 2018

View into fissure 8 cone in Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone

View into fissure 8 cone in Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone, after lava drained away.

What is next for Kīlauea Volcano
October 24, 2018

What is next for Kīlauea Volcano

What is next for Kīlauea Volcano? This is a view of the summit area from the southwest, showing the collapsed area of Halema‘uma‘u and the adjacent caldera floor. A section of Crater Rim Drive preserved on a down-dropped block is visible at the far right. Volcanic gases rising from magma stored beneath the summit continue to escape to the surface, as they have for as long

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panoramic view, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Crater Rim Drive
October 16, 2018

panoramic view, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Crater Rim Drive

In this panoramic view, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Crater Rim Drive (left foreground) disappears into the enormous void created by the collapse of Halema‘uma‘u and portions of the Kīlauea caldera floor during the dramatic events at the summit of the volcano in May-August 2018.

September 11, 2018

Kīlauea Summit

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) team completed its mission at Kīlauea Volcano's summit, mapping changes within the caldera. Since August 4, 2018, the number of earthquakes at the summit have decreased and the rate of subsidence has stabilized. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit is less than 200 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since

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September 5, 2018

Close Up of Cone Forming - Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone

A closer view of the small cone forming on the floor of crater within fissure 8 today (Sept. 5). By this morning, bits of molten lava emitted from the cone every few seconds had built it up to an estimated height of around 3-4 m (about 10-13 ft).

September 4, 2018

Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

On September 4-7, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems team flew several missions documenting changes within fissure 8 on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone. On September 4, lava erupted on the crater floor within the vent, building a small cone on the floor and creating a flow that did not extend beyond the vent walls. On September 5, gas bursts briefly lifted the crust over a small

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